Kinesiology and Health Studies

Assistant Professors Leslie Phillips and Brian Jones;

Visiting Assistant Professor Eric Brooks;

Adjunct Instructors Mary Brooks, Dan Brown,

James Koeppe, Randy McGuire, Craig Mullins, and Jacob Ryan.

Contact the Department

Kinesiology & Health Studies
Georgetown College
400 East College Street
Georgetown, KY 40324

Department Site

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Students may pursue major and minor programs offered in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies that will prepare them both for entry-level professional careers and graduate study in Kinesiology, Exercise Science, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Athletic Training and Public Health.

 

Graduates of the majors offered in the Kinesiology and Health Science department will demonstrate:

  • a basic understanding of the physiological, anatomical, and mechanical foundations of movement;
  • the skills associated with planning, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate fitness programs;
  • the fundamental understanding of behavior as it applies to adherence to¬†exercise/fitness;
  • the knowledge and skills associated with assessing emergency health conditions requiring first aid and/or CPR;
  • the knowledge and physical skills associated with health-related fitness¬†activities;
  • a basic understanding of research techniques and tools used in the field of¬†Kinesiology and Health.

 

For the description of the Athletic Training major, see Athletic Training.

For the description of the Exercise Science major and minor, see Exercise
Science
.

For the description of the Health Science major, see Health Science.

For the description of the Public Health minor, see Public Health.

 

100. Lifetime Fitness. (1 hour) Knowledge and skills associated with the relationship of physical activity and nutrition to health and fitness; lecture and lab experiences.                                                     Fall and Spring

 

106. Racquetball. (1 hour) This course is designed to acquaint the student with racquetball. It enhances physical fitness, coordination, agility, and eye/hand coordination.                                                              As needed

 

111. Conditioning Activities. (1 hour) This course is designed to teach skills and knowledge about aerobic exercise and weight training.                                                                                                                      Fall and Spring

 

 

113. Archery. (1 hour) Fundamental skills, rules, techniques and etiquette of archery. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                                                                                        Fall

 

120. Tennis. (1 hour) Rules, skills, etiquette, and strategy relating to singles and doubles play.           Fall

 

124. Billiards and Bowling. (1 hour) Rules, skills, techniques, and etiquette for bowling and billiards. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                  As needed

 

126. Horsemanship. (1 hour) Fundamental skills and knowledge necessary for basic horsemanship with emphasis on riding styles and care and maintenance of horses. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

As needed

 

132. Golf. (1 hour) Rules, basic skills, etiquette, practice, and participation under playing conditions. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                   As needed

 

134. Fencing. (1 hour) Rules, skills, techniques, and etiquette relating to fencing.

As needed

 

136. Badminton. (1 hour) Fundamental skills, rules, techniques, and etiquette of badminton.           As needed

 

140. Basketball. (1 hour) Fundamental skills, techniques, and rules of basketball.

As needed

142. Kendo. (1 hour) KendŇć is the modern form of a centuries-old tradition of sword fighting in Japan. This course will introduce students to the etiquette, fundamentals skills, forms and philosophy of kendo training. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† As needed

 

170. Introductory Topics in Physical and Recreational Activities. (1 hour) Selected physical education activity topics. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                  As needed

 

180. First Aid, CPR, and Sport Safety. (3 hours) Emergency treatment and preventive measures for injuries and accidents with emphasis on sport injuries. Successful completion of course requirements will qualify students to receive certification by the American Heart Association.                                                                                               Fall and Spring

 

185. Introductory Athletic Training and Sports Medicine. (3 hours) This course serves as an introduction to the profession of athletic training. The role of the athletic trainer shall be explored in relation to physicians, other allied health care providers, coaches, and patient. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals essential for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of injuries to the physically active. Non-orthopedic conditions and topics will also be introduced. In addition, practical experiences will include the application of supportive techniques to the major joints of the body.                                        Fall and Spring

 

200. Medical Terminology. (3 hours) Utilizing an independent method of workbook/text, weekly quizzes, and audio tape pronunciation this course provides the student with a working knowledge of common medical terms and abbreviations. This course will use a body systems approach to medical terminology; therefore, allowing the student to learn vocabulary as it pertains to each of the systems of the body (respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, etc.). Prerequisite: Must be a declared KHS major or minor or have consent of the instructor.

Fall and Spring

 

214. Foundations of Kinesiology. (3 hours) Survey of principles and perspectives from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences related to the study of human movement.                          Fall and Spring

 

216. Recognition and Care of Athletic-related Trauma. (2 hours) An overview of the mechanism and management of trauma experienced during athletics and physical activity. Practical experiences include the application of treatment techniques for such trauma. Prerequisites: KHS 185 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                Spring

 

220. Personal Health. (3 hours) Fundamentals of health including health services, safety, drugs, and disease control.               Fall and Spring

 

230. Health and Physical Education in the Elementary School. (2 or 3 hours) Characteristics, physical growth, and needs of children in grades K-6 with games, rhythms, and activities appropriate to their physiological and emotional development.           Fall

 

271. Practicum in Athletic Training I. (1 hour) Field experiences in athletic training under a qualified Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in athletic training. Prerequisite: KHS 185 and declared Athletic Training major or consent of the instructor.                Fall

 

273. Practicum in Athletic Training II. (1 hour) Field experiences in athletic training under a qualified Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in athletic training. Prerequisite: KHS 185, KHS 271, and declared Athletic Training major or consent of the instructor.             Spring

 

275. Practicum in Athletic Training III. (1 hour) Field experiences in athletic training under a qualified Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in athletic training. Prerequisite: KHS 185, KHS 273, and declared Athletic Training major or consent of instructor.        Fall

 

277. Practicum in Athletic Training IV. (1 hour) Field experiences in athletic training under a qualified Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in athletic training. Prerequisite: KHS 185, KHS 275 and declared Athletic Training major or consent of the instructor.              Spring

279. Practicum in Athletic Training V. (1 hour) Field and clinical competencies in Athletic Training under the supervision of a qualified Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in Athletic Training. Prerequisite: KHS 277. Spring

 

285. Evaluation and Assessment I. (2 hours) Evaluation, assessment, knowledge, and prevention of injuries related to the lower extremities, including ligamentous and special testing of the major joints. Prerequisite: KHS 185 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                                                             Fall

 

287. Evaluation and Assessment II. (2 hours) Evaluation, assessment, knowledge, and prevention of injuries related to the upper extremities, including ligamentous and special testing of the major joints. Prerequisite: KHS 185 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                                                        Spring

 

304. Anatomy for Allied Health. (4 hours) A course in human anatomy for allied health and KHS students, with emphasis on gross anatomy and palpation. The following systems will be covered: musculoskeletal, endocrine, integumentary, and urogenital. Prerequisite: Bio 100 or BIO 111 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.      Fall

 

306. Physiology for Allied Health. (3 hours) A course in human physiology for allied health and KHS students. The following systems will be covered: nervous system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, temperature regulation, and the reproductive system. Prerequisites: Bio 100 or BIO 111, KHS 304, and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                                                                                                     Spring

 

306L. Physiology for Allied Health Lab. ‚Äā(1 hour) A lab course in human physiology for allied health and KHS students. the following systems will be covered: nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, temperature regulation, and the reproductive system. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 111, KHS 304, enrolled in KHS 306 and declared KHS major/minor, or have consent of the
instructor.                                                                                                                   Spring

 

310. Health Care Administration. (3 hours) Introduces methods of policy analysis and concepts of economic theory as means to understand the basic issues and trends in the health care system and analyze the impact of changes on the ability of patients to access health services, the practice of health sciences professionals and the quality and process of care.     Spring

 

315. Epidemiology. (3 hours) Covers the basic concepts and principles of Epidemiology and biostatistics. Special emphasis is placed upon application of the epidemiological concepts that are presented. Prerequisites: MAT 111 or PSY 211 and BIO 100 or BIO 111.                 Spring

 

320. Nutrition. (3 hours) Scientific study of nutrition; application of this knowledge to personal and professional areas. Must be a declared KHS major/minor and Nursing Arts major or have consent of the instructor. Fall and Spring

 

322. Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics. (3 hours) Application of principles from anatomy, physiology, and physics (mechanics) for the analysis and appreciation of human movement in sport and exercise activities. Prerequisite: KHS 304 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                                              Fall

 

324. Environmental Health. (3 hours) Covers the effect of environmental factors on the health and well being of mankind. Prerequisite: KHS 220. As needed

 

352. Techniques of Coaching and Officiating Volleyball. (3 hours) Skills of coaching, officiating, interpretation, and application of rules.                                                                                                                             As needed

 

356. Techniques of Coaching and Officiating Football. (3 hours) Intended to familiarize the student with strategy, tactics, and fundamentals of football; methods of officiating.                                    As needed

 

358. Techniques of Coaching and Officiating Basketball. (3 hours) Designed to acquaint the student with fundamental techniques for coaching basketball; current trends in offense and defense; insights into modern coaching psychology.

As needed

 

360. Techniques of Coaching and Officiating Baseball and Softball. (3 hours) Techniques in coaching baseball and softball, organizational, administrative aspects of coaching; officiating techniques and rules governing baseball.

As needed

 

390. Therapeutic Modalities. (3 hours) Development of knowledge and practical use regarding the indications, contradictions, actions, and side effects of modalities (ultrasound, electrical muscle stimulation, cold and warm applications, and others). Prerequisite: KHS 216 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                    Fall

 

395. Therapeutic Exercise & Rehabilitation. (3 hours) Focus on procedures to develop and apply exercise and rehabilitation programs for athletic injuries. Includes the use of a variety of isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic equipment. Prerequisite: KHS 216 and declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                 Spring

 

400. Psycho-social Issues in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (3 hours) Study of the literature pertaining to the psycho-social factors that may affect athletic performance, and rehabilitation process, compliance with medically prescribed health/fitness programs, and other current topics. Experience in basic techniques of health and rehabilitation counseling will be acquired through in-class exercises and field placements. Prerequisite: PSY 111.                                                       Fall and Spring

 

403. General Medical Conditions & Pharmacology for Athletic Training. (3 hours) Advanced course designed to recognize and appreciate various medical conditions of diverse populations, including youth, adolescents, adult, and special needs. This course will also encompass common pharmacological applications used by allied health professionals including Certified Athletic Trainers. Prerequisites: KHS 216, KHS 273 and declared Athletic Training major or consent of instructor.              Fall

 

405. Health Behavior Modification. (3 hours) In depth study of the theories and principles of behavioral science and skills development in the methods of modifying and controlling behavior in both clinical and personal settings. Emphasis on techniques of managing self-behavior and behavior of others.                                                                              Fall

 

407. Organization & Administration in Athletic Training. (2 hours) Advanced course designed to demonstrate management challenges that Certified Athletic Trainers encounter during daily operation in the field of athletic training. Covers the theories of organization and administration and applies them to real world situations in the profession of athletic training. Prerequisite: KHS 216, KHS 273 and declared Athletic Training major or consent of instructor.                                               Spring

 

410. Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (3 hours) This course is designed to familiarize the student with the various testing procedures used in Kinesiology and instruct him/her on how to use the results. The areas studied will include a wide range, including test of knowledge, skills, fitness, and attitudes. In addition, each student will be introduced to research methods. Students are expected to conduct a research project. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or PSY 211. Spring

 

423. Physiology of Exercise. (3 hours) Nature of neuromuscular activity; physical potential of the human body related to requirements of exercise. Prerequisites: KHS 304 and KHS 306.                                                Spring

 

435. Research in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (3 hours) Analysis of research being done in selected areas of Kinesiology and Health and conduct of research on an appropriate topic.                                     As needed

 

440. Independent Study in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (1, 2, or 3 hours) Must be a declared KHS major or have consent of the instructor.                                                                                                           As needed

 

450. Senior Seminar in Athletic Training. (2 hours) This course will serve as a comprehensive overview of the field of Athletic Training providing the senior level Athletic Training student the opportunity to synthesize coursework and discuss the care of athletic injuries from the time of injury until return to play. This course is designed to be the culminating class for those students enrolled in the Athletic Training major.                                                                                                                         Spring

 

452. Senior Seminar in Kinesiology and Health Science. (3 hours) This course will serve as a comprehensive overview of the field of Kinesiology and Health Science (KHS), providing the senior level KHS student the opportunity to synthesize coursework and discuss current issues in Kinesiology. This course is designed to be the culminating class for those students enrolled in the Exercise Science and Health Science major.                                                                                             Spring

 

 

460. Internship in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (1-6 hours) Must be a declared KHS major/minor or have consent of the instructor.                                                                                                                              As needed

 

470. Advanced Topics in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (3-6 hours).

As needed

Click to See Career Options
AREA EMPLOYERS STRATEGIES

EXERCISE AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Health Promotion
  • Primary Care
  • Inpatient Medical
  • Specialized Health Care

Allied Health Professions

  • Apply to Doctorate program in Physical therapy
  • Occupational therapy graduate program
  • Nursing graduate program
  • Chiropractic School
  • Dental School
  • Physician Assistant School
  • Many more allied health profession schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Hospitals
  • Health clubs and fitness centers
  • Olympic training centers
  • Rehabilitation clinics
  • Public health agencies
Major in one of the social sciences and supplement coursework with hard science classes. Acquire training in the areas of research, grant writing, and statistics. Volunteer in a hospital or fitness center. Develop strong written and oral communication skills. Learn to work well in a team environment. Earn a graduate degree in clinical, counseling, social, or experimental psychology for health psychology opportunities. Earn a graduate degree in sport psychology, with an exercise emphasis, for a career in exercise psychology. Pursue a postdoctoral internship or fellowship for advanced career opportunities.

SPORT MANAGEMENT

  • Athlete Representation
  • Public Relations
  • Sales
  • Marketing
  • Publicity
  • Promotions
  • Operations
  • Event Coordination
  • Program Coordination
  • Fund Raising
  • University Athletics
  • Administration
  • Professional teams
  • Professional athletes
  • Sport associations (e.g., NBA, PGA, NCAA)
  • Local sport and tourism corporations
  • Arenas
  • Auditoriums
  • Stadiums
  • Colleges and universities
  • Health clubs
  • Sport facilities
Major in sport management or sport administration. Earn a master’s degree for increased opportunities. Develop outstanding communication skills, written and oral. Take courses in marketing, public relations, and advertising. Pursue a degree in law to aid in negotiating contracts. Obtain accounting or business skills and experience. Gain experience with public speaking and sales. Volunteer to do publicity for campus organizations or local nonprofit groups. Volunteer to coordinate athletic programs and events such as marathons, golf tournaments, or special Olympics for campus organizations or local non-profit groups. Write articles or columns for campus or local newspapers. Join sport-oriented associations and organizations. Obtain an internship or part-time job with a team or other athletic organization. Work with minor league or local teams as a way to enter the field and gain experience. Be willing to work in any capacity to get started.

SPORTING GOODS

  • Store Management
  • Brand/Product Representation
  • Product Development
  • Product Distribution
  • Marketing
  • Sporting goods manufacturers
  • Sporting goods stores
  • Exercise equipment manufacturers
Major in business, marketing, sport management, or related field. Obtain a part-time job or internship in the area of wholesaling or retailing. Develop excellent communication skills. Build relationships with coaches, athletic directors, and college equipment/uniform representatives. Volunteer as a team equipment manager.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

  • Public and private schools, K-12
  • Colleges and universities
Obtain a degree in education, physical education, or other sport related field in addition to appropriate state teacher licensure. Earn dual certification for increased job opportunities. Become familiar with a variety of physical cognitive and affective disabilities if interested in an adaptive physical education career. Supplement coursework with special education classes. Secure a part-time position with a youth recreation center, college athletic facility, or intramural athletic administration department. Develop competitive and instructive proficiency in a wide array of sports. Obtain a graduate degree to teach at the college level or to advance into administrative positions. Become a graduate teaching assistant for physical education courses.

COACHING

  • Professional Coaching
  • High School Coaching
  • College Coaching
  • Private Coaching
  • Professional sport teams
  • Colleges and universities
  • High schools and middle schools
  • Recreational organizations or leagues (e.g., YMCA)
  • Country clubs
  • Racket clubs
  • Golf and tennis resorts
  • Cruise Lines
  • City parks and recreation departments
Consider majoring in exercise science, sport management, or physical education.
Obtain teacher licensure for high school and middle school coaching opportunities. Gain extensive, advanced playing experience. Maintain current CPR and first aid certifications. Gain additional knowledge in areas of strength training, fitness, nutrition, and conditioning. Learn about and practice motivational techniques. Become familiar with legal and regulatory issues related to coaching (e.g., NCAA regulations). Volunteer to coach neighborhood, church, and community teams. Attend practices of teams at various levels to observe coaches’ techniques. Serve as a referee or umpire. Seek a graduate assistant position in athletic administration, instruction, or coaching. Obtain an assistant and then head coaching position at the university level to increase possibility of progressing to the professional level.

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Consultation
  • Performance Enhancement
  • Colleges and universities
  • Olympic training centers
  • Competitive youth sport centers
  • Recreation organizations and leagues
  • Professional sport teams
  • Professional and competitive athletes
  • Hospitals
Major in psychology, physical education, exercise science or other physical activity related field. Obtain a doctoral degree in sport psychology, sport sociology, or clinical/counseling psychology and complete postdoctoral training if you desire to work with professional sport teams or athletes. Develop good relationships with coaches and other athletic department personnel. Express a willingness to learn from coaches and athletes. Gain experience in a variety of different sports. Assist faculty with research. Develop strong written and oral communication skills. Consider coaching youth teams. Show genuine care when working with athletes. Join professional associations such as the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 47 (Sport and Exercise Psychology) or the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP).

General Information About Exercise Science

  • Be willing to work with sport teams in any capacity, realizing that most people start in low-level positions. Careers in sport and athletics are extremely competitive. Get as much exercise science experience as possible while in school.
  • Join professional exercise science associations. Read their publications and attend their meetings, seminars, and conventions to learn more about the field, as well as to make important contacts.
  • Look for jobs in the minor leagues as a way to enter the sport industry.
  • Earn a graduate or professional degree in exercise scinece for increased opportunities.
  • Maintain excellent personal fitness and athletic proficiency.
  • Learn to relate well to a variety of people from various backgrounds.
  • Consider entering the field of athletics through skills and experience in another area such as accounting, sales, or information systems.

Helpful Links

Prepared by the Career Planning staff of Career Services at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2005) UTK is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA /ADEA Employer

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