Education

Associate Professor Yoli Carter, Dean of Education

Assistant Professors Angie Cox (Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education), Lisa Eddy, June Hyndman, Alison Jackson-Wood and Carol Williams

Contact the Department

Education Department
Georgetown College
400 East College Street
Georgetown, KY 40324

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The Teacher Education Program at Georgetown College is rooted in the liberal studies tradition, the Vision Statement, and the Eight Guiding Principles of the College. The phrase developing scholars who are competent and caring educators, committed to a spirit of service and learning serves as the theme and philosophical basis that guides the ‚Äúdynamics‚ÄĚ of the teacher education program here. This philosophy embraces an ethic of caring coupled with excellence in curriculum design and professional practice. It provides both the conceptual framework for the undergraduate and graduate teacher education programs and a guide for program development and evaluation. These concepts are best expressed in the program model depicted above, which includes three primary domains: (1) Professional Skills and Competencies, (2) Professional Values and Dispositions, and (3) Reflective Practice.

 

A variety of classroom and on-campus experiences, extensive fieldwork, and continuous counseling and evaluation of students are integral components of the Teacher Education Program, and serve to meet the following objectives:

  • to send teachers into the workforce who possess the professional skills and¬†competencies necessary for effecting high levels of achievement for all students;
  • to send teachers into the workforce who have the professional values and dispositions necessary for creating supportive and constructive learning¬†communities;
  • to send teachers into the workforce who engage in continuous reflective practice in order to improve their own teaching, increase student learning, and to make positive changes in their school and communities.

 

Within this framework, bachelor’s degree level students are able to meet Kentucky’s New Teacher Standards for Preparation and Certification and graduate students enhance their ability to meet the Experienced Teacher Standards. All students must complete the appropriate PRAXIS Tests to receive certification. Please note the EPSB disclaimer in the next paragraph.

Teacher certification requirements are subject to change. Before registering for the test(s), please refer to the Education Professional Standards Board website at www.kyepsb.net for current requirements or contact Ms. Jaime Rice at
502-564-4606 or 888-598-7667.

 

The Elementary Education Department requires majors to demonstrate:

  • content knowledge within their own discipline(s) and in application to other disciplines;
  • effective designing and planning of instruction that develops student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge;
  • effective implementation and management of classroom instruction;
  • effective assessment and communication of students‚Äô learning results;
  • efficacy in creating and maintaining effective learning climates within classrooms and schools;
  • collaboration with colleagues and parents of students;
  • effective and meaningful implementation of technology;
  • commitment to the profession and to students and families by creating supportive and constructive learning communities;
  • an appreciation for diversity and a belief that all students can learn;
  • high moral and ethical standards: respect for others; strong sense of justice, fairness, empathy, and integrity;
  • reflection and evaluation of teaching and learning: practical reflection of teaching and learning; critical reflection of teaching and learning.

 

TEACHING CERTIFICATION AREAS

The following teacher preparation programs are offered by Georgetown College and are approved by the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board as a basis for the issuance of the corresponding teaching certification:

 

P-5 Major in Elementary School

5-9 Certification in Middle School. Students must select a Georgetown College major and one or two teaching areas chosen from: English and Communications, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies

8-12 Certification in Secondary School. Biology, English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Social Studies

P-12 Certification for Elementary/Middle/Secondary School. Art, French, German, Music (vocal and instrumental), Spanish

 

Major in Elementary School (P-5)

(B.S. Degree) Fifty-nine hours required. The B.S. Degree inElementary Education requires forty-four semester hours in Education: EDU 131, 233, 307, 309, 313, 315, 317, 321, 323, 329, 345, 413, and 462-463. In addition, twelve hours of allied courses are required: MAT 203-204 (six hours), KHS 230 (two hours), and two of the following three courses to equal four credit hours: ART 313 (two hours), MUS 315 (two hours), and THE 407 (two hours). Elementary education majors are strongly encouraged to take PHY 105 to fulfill the Area of Inquiry requirement in Physical Science. An academic minor is also recommended. A student must complete all requirements for the Kentucky Provisional Certificate and successfully complete the appropriate PRAXIS examinations in order to be certified and to earn a degree from Georgetown College.

 

Recommended Social Science Minor for Elementary Majors (P-5)

Twenty-one semester hours required in the social sciences minor (for elementary education students only) with a concentration of nine hours in one of the departments identified below. At least one course must be taken from each of the departments of History, Political Science, Economics, Sociology, and Psychology. No more than one class may be counted both for an Area of Inquiry requirement and for this minor.

 

History (no prerequisites)

223 Intro to American History 1492-1877

225 Intro to American History 1877-present

304 Kentucky History (Required Course)

306 Colonial and Revolutionary America

308 History of the Early Republic

426 History of the American Indian

 

Political Science

100 American Government

309 State Government

319 Constitutional Rights

335 Legislative Process

409 Kentucky Government

 

Economics

221 Macroeconomics

223 Microeconomics

317 Economic History of the U. S.

 

Sociology

(Principles of Sociology (SOC 111) or Cultural Diversity (SOC 118) is a prerequisite for SOC 373; therefore students are advised to take SOC 111 or SOC 118 as an Area of Inquiry requirement.)

211 Community

365 Education for Social Change

373 Class and Stratification

 

Psychology

(General Psychology (PSY 111) is a prerequisite; therefore students are advised to take PSY111 as a Foundations and Core requirement.)

328 Learning

340 Child Development

343 Personality

419 School Psychology

 

Certification in Middle School (5-9)

The Middle Grades Education Program is a series of courses and experiences leading to certification. Students must select a Georgetown College major and specific courses from one or two areas of emphasis chosen from the following:

English/Communication: Take thirty semester hours in English and Communications including English 211, 213, 302, 316, 318, 320, Communication 200 and 308, and Theater 220.

Mathematics: Requires eighteen hours including Math 125, 225, 325, 301, 335, and 3 additional hours above 221.

Science: Twenty-four semester hours are required, 8-9 of which must be in biology. In addition, students must take 8-9 additional hours from either chemistry, physics, or earth science. The final 6-8 hours must be taken from the remaining two disciplines. All four areas must include a laboratory experience.

Social Studies: Twenty-seven semester hours are required including United States History (6 hours), World Civilization (6 hours), Political Science (3 hours), Economics (3 hours), Sociology (6 hours), Psychology (3 hours). In addition, students must earn 30 hours of professional education courses: EDU 131, 233, 307, 309, 326, 333 or 339 or 341 or 343, 345, 423, and 471-472.

 

To be recommended for certification as a teacher, a student must complete all requirements for the Kentucky Provisional Certificate and successfully complete the appropriate PRAXIS Examinations in any area of emphasis.

 

Certification in Secondary School (8-12)

The teacher education program enables a student to obtain a major in an academic area and to complete certification requirements. Since the course work for the teaching major with certification sometimes differs from the graduation major, students should confer with the department chair in the major to verify specific requirements. In addition to major and minor (if chosen) requirements, students earn 30-33 semester hours in education including: EDU 131, 233, 307, 309, 337, 333, or 339 or 341 or 343, 345, 423, and 467-468. To be recommended for certification as a teacher, a student must complete all requirements for the Kentucky Provisional Certificate and successfully complete appropriate PRAXIS Examinations.

 

Certification for Elementary/Middle/Secondary School (P-12)

The P-12 certification program allows a student to obtain a major in an academic area for teaching at all grade levels. Since the course work for the teaching major certification sometimes differs from the graduation major, students should confer with the department chair in the major to verify specific requirements. In addition to major and minor requirements Art, French, German, and Spanish students must earn 31 semester hours in education including EDU 131, 233, 307, 309, 313, 337, 345, 423, 473-474. Music education students take 24 semester hours in education including EDU 131, 233, 307, 337, 423, 473-474 and meet the requirements in multicultural education and technology through coursework in the music department. To be recommended for certification as a teacher, a student must complete all requirements for the Kentucky Provisional Certificate and successfully complete appropriate PRAXIS Examinations.

CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION INTO TEACHER EDUCATION

Students are provided with a current copy of the Teacher Education and Certifi-cation Handbook in EDU 131. This Handbook includes curriculum contracts for every certification program and additional information for admission to the Teacher Education Program and to Student Teaching. Students should consult the Handbook for information concerning specific program requirements. Stu-dents must apply for admission to Teacher Education after completing five hours of education classes including EDU 131, Current Issues in Education.; and EDU 233, Student Behavior, Development and Learning.   PLEASE NOTE: Students are responsible for making sure that all materials (including references) are turned in to the Education Department on a timely basis. Applications must be complete in order to be considered for admission into the department by the Teacher Education Committee.

October 1 is the deadline for submitting application materials and portfolio for consideration for admission during the fall semester; February 15 is the deadline for second semester consideration. Post-baccalaureate students must adhere to the same schedule as regular students. In addition, post-baccalaureate students must complete the Application for Admission into Student Teaching concurrently.

Each student must have a 2.75 cumulative grade point average and have completed all previous education classes with a grade of ‚ÄúC‚ÄĚ or above. Reminder: A 2.75 grade point average in education classes is also required for entrance into student teaching.

Each student must provide three references from faculty/staff who will recommend admission to the teacher education program (one must be from a professor in your major).

Each student must have a copy of the American College Test (ACT) score on file with Georgetown College.

Each student must receive a passing score on the PPST according to the area of certification to be considered for admission to teacher education.  Please consult the Education Department for additional information .

Each student must demonstrate written proficiency as evidenced by earning a ‚ÄúC‚ÄĚ or above in English 112 and by accurate and careful completion of appropriate education forms (applications, portfolio). The application must be well written and error-free in order to be considered approved by the Teacher Education Committee. Students may want to utilize the services of the College Writing Center.

Each student must complete an official curriculum contract with his or her designated education advisor. Content majors are required to have major departmental chairs’ signatures on curriculum contracts. This contract must be in the student’s file in the education department before admission to the department will be considered. Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program is required for elementary education candidates prior to declaring a major.

Each student must demonstrate satisfactory performance in an interview, which includes presentation of the items in the Interview Portfolio (see Teacher Education and Certification Handbook for additional information on the Interview Portfolio).

Each student must be a person whose moral, social, and ethical behavior is acceptable in the school community as well as in the community at large. Each student must read and uphold the Kentucky School Personnel Code of Ethics and affirm a commitment to uphold the code during the interviewing process for entrance into the department (if not completed beforehand).

Special Note on Course Permissions: Many courses in the Education Department require prior acceptance into Teacher Education before registering for the classes. This process is detailed above under Criteria for Admission into Teacher Education. For more information, contact your Education Advisor or the Education Department Office.

 

CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION INTO CLINICAL PRACTICE

(STUDENT TEACHING)

Student teaching candidates are required to submit a professional portfolio,
including:

 

(1) A lesson plan that you have developed and taught. The lesson plan should be comprehensive and should include evidence of student learning and a corresponding reflection and analysis.

 

(2) A professional growth plan that includes a reflection on your professional skills and dispositions, and goals for professional growth during student teaching. The professional growth plan should be in the form of an essay, and should relate your skills and dispositions to those outlined in the Education Department’s Conceptual Framework and to your own personal education philosophy.

 

Additionally, each student teacher candidate must submit an application for student teaching before registering for EDU 315 and 329 (elementary students) and EDU 333 or 341 or 343 (secondary students). ). These additional application materials must be submitted by September 15 for spring student teaching and February 1 for fall student teaching: curriculum contract, recommendation forms, information record for supervising teacher, and the major/minor check sheet (see Registrar). In addition, the student must meet the following criteria for acceptance into student teaching:

Senior standing shall be prerequisite for admission into student teaching. In addition, each student must have been admitted to the Teacher Education Program and must have been in residence at Georgetown College for at least one semester prior to student teaching.

Each student teacher candidate must be approved by the Teacher Education Committee. Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program does not mean automatic approval for student teaching.

Each student teacher candidate must submit a copy of a current medical examination before the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to do student teaching.

Each student must undergo a criminal background check prior to student teaching.

Each student must have completed the required hours of clinical and field-based experiences prior to student teaching. Transfer students must provide documentation of field and clinical hours earned at other colleges.

The student teacher candidate shall have achieved the following academic requirements:

an overall academic standing of at least 2.75.

an academic standing of 2.75 in the teaching major/specialty area or a 2.5 – 2.74 average and a passing score on the PRAXIS Specialty Area Test(s).

approval by the major department‚ÄĒincluding three recommendations by major professors attesting to subject matter competency and possession of the dispositions desired in teachers.

completions of all required prerequisite professional education courses with an academic standing of at least 2.75.

 

Each student teacher candidate is required to submit a professional portfolio as part of the application process. Students are advised to consult the Department of Education staff regarding the required format for the portfolio.

Student teacher candidates must become student members of the National and Kentucky Education Associations‚ÄĒin order to receive liability insurance coverage during the student teaching experience.

Each student must be a person whose moral, social, and ethical behavior is acceptable in the school community as well as in the community at large. Each student must read and uphold the Kentucky School Personnel Code of Ethics and affirm a commitment to uphold the code during student teaching.

 

Georgetown College student teachers will be placed in a public school setting within a 25 mile radius of campus and in a school with which Georgetown College holds a contractual agreement. Therefore, any student making a request to student teach beyond the 25 mile radius must petition the Teacher Education Committee for approval. Included in the petition would be an explanation as to reasons that would warrant an alternative placement. The TEC would then either vote to accept or decline the petition.

 

It is expected that students will spend full-time in their student teaching experience. Any student who requests a leave from student teaching is required to complete the ‚ÄúRequest for Released Time from Student Teaching‚ÄĚ form. Only extenuating circumstances will be considered, and requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

131. Current Issues in Education. (2 hours) An introduction to education in American society through an analysis of some of the most pressing issues in the field, their historical and philosophical underpinnings, and implications. A ten-hour field experience is required. This is normally the first course in the teacher education program. Students who do not have a minimum ACT Composite Score of 21 should take and earn a passing score on the PPST while enrolled in this course. First year students may take a three credit section of EDU 131 and meet the Foundations 112 requirement.                                                             Spring only.

233. Student Development, Behavior, and Learning. (3 hours) A study of the major theories of learning and of cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development and their applications in K-12 classrooms. Lesson plans, including assessment, will be written and taught. Laboratory experiences in the schools are required and will be used to practice reflection and to demonstrate various aspects of learning and stages of student development. Co- or Prerequisite: EDU 131. NOTE:  No prerequisite is required for Child Development minors and students who are not pursuing a degree in education.

307. Educating Exceptional Children. (2 hours) This course is designed to help pre-service teachers understand their role in identifying and serving students with identified learning challenges in an inclusive educational setting.  Emphasis is placed on the skills needed to collaborate with special educators, participation in Responsive to Treatment Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Study of the major categories of exceptionality designed to meet the needs of pre-service teachers who must implement appropriate services for students with special needs in a regular classroom. Field component in school classrooms required. ACT Composite Score of 21 or passing score on PPST is required prior to registering for this class. Students must also register for EDU 309 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

 

309. Teaching in a Diverse Society. (2 hours) An introductory course in multicultural education that explores current issues and practices related to teaching in a pluralistic society. Field component in school classrooms required. ACT Composite Score of 21 or passing score on PPST is required prior to registering for this class. Students must also register for EDU 307 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduat Education.

313. Fundamentals of Teaching in the Elementary School. (3 hours) Development of sound philosophy of effective and affective teaching in the elementary school. Includes effective instructional practices, quality assessment, and creating a positive learning environment. Student must be admitted to the Teacher Education program prior to enrolling in this course.  Field component in school classrooms required. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and 233.

 

315. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School. (3 hours) Study of the methods and materials to effectively teach mathematics in K-5. Field component in school classrooms required. This course is taken the semester prior to student teaching. Students must have been admitted to the Teacher Education Program and have an application for student teaching on file in the Education Department prior to registering for this course. Students must also register for EDU 329 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education Prerequisites: EDU 131, 233, and 313, MAT 203, 204.

 

317. Teaching Language Skills in the Elementary Schools. (3 hours) Instructional philosophy, research, methods, and materials for teaching communication skills: reading, listening, speaking, writing, spelling, and grammar. Field component in school classrooms required. ACT Composite Score of 21 or passing score on PPST is required prior to registering for this class. This course should be taken within the two semesters prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: EDU 131, 233 and 313.

 

321. Teaching Science in the Elementary School. (3 hours) Study of the principles, methods, and materials basic to the teaching of science using inquiry in the elementary school. A field component in school classrooms is required. Successful completion of MAT 103-104 should be achieved before enrolling. Successful completion of PHY 105 before enrolling in EDU 321 is strongly encouraged. An ACT Composite Score of 21 or a passing score on the PPST is required prior to registering for this class. Students must also register for EDU 323 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and 233.

323. Teaching Integrated Social Studies in the Elementary School. (3 hours) Social studies will be considered broadly, emphasizing such fields as economics and culture in addition to history and citizenship. Careful study of the principles, methods, and materials basic to integrating social studies will be the focus. Lesson and unit planning, including assessment, is included. Students must also register for EDU 321 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and 233.

 

326. The Teacher and the Middle School. (2 hours) An examination of the goals and practices of middle schools, including teaming, looping, and exploration. The cognitive and social development of young adolescents will be studied in theory and in practice. Lesson planning for middle schools students, including assessment, will be emphasized. Field experience required. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and 233.

 

329. Teaching Reading and Literature in the Elementary Grades. (5 hours) Survey of traditional and contemporary children’s literature and its uses in the teaching of literacy; provides methods, strategies, and assessment procedures for teaching literacy to a diverse student population. Field component in school classrooms required. This course is taken the semester prior to student teaching. Students must have been admitted to Teacher Education Program and have an application for student teaching on file in the Education Department prior to registering for this course. Students must also register for EDU 315 in the same semester unless waived by the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

 

333. Middle/Secondary English Methods. (2 or 3 hours) Study of curriculum, unit and lesson development and study of evaluation methods, including KERA portfolio evaluation, considering philosophical and practical issues relevant to composition and literature. Field component in school classrooms required. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and 233.

337. Teaching in the Middle and Secondary School. (3 hours) Topics include principles of learning; classroom communication; group dynamics, and the instructional process. Students will spend one segment of the class in seminars with practicing middle and secondary educators in the identified teaching fields. Field component in school classrooms required. Students must have been admitted to Teacher Education Program and an application for student teaching must be on file in the Education Department prior to registering for this course.

 

339. Middle/Secondary Mathematics Methods. (3 hours) Topics include effective strategies that reflect the NCTM Standards, using instructional materials and technology for representing math concepts, promoting learning math with understanding, and enabling all students to succeed in math. Field component required.Taken semester before student teaching. Must be admitted to teacher education and have filed application for student teaching on file. Prerequisites: EDU 131, 233, 337.

 

341. Middle/Secondary Science Methods. (3 hours) Focuses on effective teaching strategies that reflect the nature, method and content of science, creating classroom environments to foster inquiry and understanding. Topics include lesson and unit planning, adapting instruction, using technology to promote learning and assessment. Field component required. Taken semester before student teaching. Must be admitted to teacher education and have filed application for student teaching. Prerequisites: EDU 131, 233, 337.

 

343. Middle/Secondary Social Studies Methods. (3 hours) Focuses on effective teaching strategies in history, geography, economics, world cultures, civics. Topics include lesson and unit planning, adapting instruction, using technology to promote inquiry, assessing student learning. Field component required. Taken semester before student teaching. Must be admitted to teacher education and have filed application for student teaching. Prerequisites: EDU 131, 233, 337.

 

345. Classroom Applications of Technology. (3 hours) Applications of important concepts and considerations in using technology to support , assess, and stimulate learning in the classroom. Field component in school classrooms required. ACT Composite Score of 21 or passing score on PPST is required prior to registering for this class. Course should be taken concurrently with a methods course, or, at a minimum, a 300 -level methods course must have been taken prior to enrolling in EDU 345.

 

413. Elementary Classroom Management. (2 hours) This course is taken during the student teaching semester and assists participants in developing a personalized classroom management program as an integral part of their overall teaching approach. Topics include developmental aspects of student behavior, theories relating to elementary classroom management, and practical approaches to successful classroom leadership. Approval by the TEC for student teaching is required prior to registering for this class.

 

423. Secondary Classroom Management. (2 hours) The course will assist students in developing a personalized classroom management program that will be an integral part of their overall teaching approach. Topics include developmental aspects of student behavior, theories relating to secondary classroom management, and practical approaches to successful classroom leadership based on each student’s orientation toward teaching control/student autonomy. Objectives include the following: a self-evaluation of a video-taped lesson, including a professional growth plan, a comprehensive classroom management plan, and critical reflections. This course is taken the same semester as student teaching. Approval by the TEC for student teaching is required prior to registering for this class.

 

440. Independent Study. (1, 2, or 3 hours) Guided study in education based upon student interest and need.

 

450. Seminar. (1, 2, or 3 hours) Selected studies in Education.

461. Internship in Education.

462-463. Supervised Student Teaching in the Elementary Grades. (6 hours each) An extended period of continuous full-time professional activities with a given group of learners with increasing responsible experiences in all aspects of the teacher’s work. It is focused on the analytical approach to the development of teaching skills and takes place in the public or private school setting under supervision of school and college personnel. The initial Elementary Certificate requires twelve semester hours credit. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching; see Handbook on Teacher Education and Certification. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

 

467-468. Supervised Student Teaching in the Secondary School. (6 hours each) An extended period of continuous full-time professional activities with a given group of learners with increasing responsible experiences in all aspects of the teacher’s work. It is focused on the analytical approach to the development of teaching skills and takes place in the public or private school setting under supervision of school and college personnel. The initial secondary certification requires twelve semester hours credit. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching; see Handbook on Teacher Education and Certification. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

 

471-472. Supervised Student Teaching in the Middle Grades. (6 hours each) Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching; see Handbook on Teacher Education & Certification. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

 

473-474. Supervised Student Teaching: 12 Grades. (6 hours each) Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching; see Handbook on Teacher Education and Certification. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

Click to See Career Options
AREAEMPLOYERSSTRATEGIES

K-12

Teaching: Pre-school , Elementary, Middle, SecondaryAdministration: Principalship, SuperintendencySpecial Services: Guidance Counseling, School Psychology, School Social Work, Occupational and Physical Therapy, Audiology and Speech Pathology, Library/Information Services, Special Education, Curriculum Supervision, Subject Area Supervision
  • Elementary, middle and secondary schools: public, private, Montessori, etc.
  • Day care centers and nursery schools
  • Boards of Education
Complete a college level teacher preparation program. Obtain teaching certificate/license for desired subject area and/or grade level. Requirements for certification/licensure vary by state. Obtain dual certification for better employability. Private schools may not require certification or licensure. Obtain master’s degree in subject area for increased employability. Get involved in student teacher organizations. Acquire teaching experience. Obtain Ph.D. and certificate in school administration. Graduate study required for “special service” fields. Obtain master’s degree in area to become specialist. Requirements for certification and/or accreditation vary by state.

HIGHER EDUCATION

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Administration
  • Student Affairs
  • Information/Library Services
  • Four-year colleges and universities
  • Two-year and community colleges
  • Technical schools
  • Medical and professional schools
Earn Ph.D. to teach and research at four-year institutions. Master’s or Ph.D. degree is required to teach at two-year schools. Earn a Ph.D. in higher education administration for upper level positions in university administration. Earn master’s in student personnel, student development, or counseling for student affairs positions. Obtain master’s in library/information sciences. Gain related experience through student positions such as Resident Assistants, Orientation Leaders, etc. Seek leadership roles in campus organizations.

ADULT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

  • Inservice Education
  • Staff Development
  • Professional Development
  • Leisure-oriented Education
  • GED Preparation
  • Literacy Development
  • English as a Second Language
  • K-12 school systems
  • Boards of Education
  • Colleges and universities
  • Two-year and technical schools
  • Community organizations: YMCA, Red Cross, etc.
  • Correctional institutions
  • Hospitals
  • Museums
  • Professional associations
  • Nursing homes/Adult day care
    Vocational services
Attain a master’s or Ph.D. degree in adult education or a graduate degree in a subject or specialized area. Gain a reputation of expertise and experience in a subject, profession, art, craft or trade. Obtain teaching or instructional experience. May need certification or accreditation.

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

  • Training and Development
  • Human Resources
  • Sales
  • Customer Service
  • Publishing and Technical Writing
  • Consulting
  • Public and private corporations
  • Consulting firms
  • Marketing companies
  • Bookstores
  • Publishers: Textbook, newspaper, magazine, book
  • Test-preparation companies
  • Software companies
  • Staffing agencies
Take some general business and computer courses. Earn a graduate degree in human resource development. Gain experience in organizational development or marketing. Become current with business and industry literature and news. Learn desktop publishing and other software packages.

GOVERNMENT

  • Administration
  • Planning
  • Evaluation
  • Management
  • Research and Writing
  • Teaching
  • Social Work
Federal government agencies: Department of Education, Department of Defense, Overseas schools for military dependents, Department of Labor, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Health and Human Services, Library of Congress, National Archives, National Science Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, Peace Corps, Social service agencies, Vista, State and local governmentLearn federal, state, and local job application procedures. Gain experience and an advanced, typically Ph.D, degree for top positions in government.

NONPROFIT

  • Teaching or Training
  • Programming
  • Public Relations
  • Administration
  • Fundraising
  • Adoption agencies
  • Scouts
  • Camps
  • United Way agencies
  • YMCA/YWCA
  • Group homes
  • Mental health clinics
  • Community recreation centers
  • Other public or private social
  • service organizations
Gain experience through volunteer work or internships. Develop writing and public speaking skills. Learn to work with people of different ages and backgrounds. Add additional coursework in area of interest such as human services, counseling or psychology. Consider certification in special education for greater employability.

General Information

  • Develop excellent communication skills, verbal and written.
  • Develop good computer skills.
  • Demonstrate enthusiasm and energy for the field.
  • Need desire to work with and help people.
  • Obtain part-time, summer, internship, or volunteer experience with the age group you intend to work with in various settings: pre-schools, daycares, camps, community agencies, adult centers, YMCA’s, etc.
  • Participate in co-curricular activities and related organizations to broaden skills and interests.
  • Decide on level of teaching and specific area of interest.
  • Bachelor’s degree is sufficient for certification/licensure to teach K-12 in most states. Obtain a master’s degree for advancement and increased earning potential. Advanced degree required for specialists, education administration, college teaching and other professional positions.
  • For career options outside of education, identify transferable skills learned in teaching that are applicable to alternative careers: effective communication both verbal and written, teaching and instruction, program planning, organization and record-keeping, working under pressure and meeting deadlines, motivational skills, creativity, working autonomously, decision-making, problem solving, and research skills.

Helpful Links

Prepared by the Career Planning staff of Career Services at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
(2005) UTK is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA /ADEA Employer

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