Oxford Tutorials, Honors Increments, Honors Contracts, and Honors Theses

Oxford Tutorials with Dr. Bell

Spring 2013 –  Kristina Griffith (studying at Oxford in Spring 2014)

Spring 2013 - Elizabeth Foote

Oxford Tutorials with Dr. Price

Spring 2013 – Marc Briel (studied at Oxford in Fall 2013)

Spring 2013 – Hannah Prassel

Spring 2012 – Ashley Fox (studied at Oxford in Spring 2013)

Spring 2012 – David Harrison (studied at Oxford in Fall 2013)

Spring 2011 – Ethan Smith (studied at Oxford in Spring 2012)

Spring 2011 – Meredith Mueller (studied at Oxford in Fall 2011)

Spring 2009 – Rebecca Thompson (studied at Oxford in Fall 2010)

Spring 2008 – Sara Boyd (studied at Oxford in Fall 2008)

Spring 2008 – Heather Scott

Learn about the College’s Oxford Tutorial Program: http://www.georgetowncollege.edu/oxford/tutorial-program/

Honors Increments for Dr. McKenzie’s Social Psychology class

Elise Vanmeter’s Fall 2013 honors increment in Social Psychology focused on the relationships between self-esteem, religiosity, and narcissism.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Elizabeth Foote completed a correlational study investigating three areas of interest during the Spring 2013 Social Psychology class. Her final product included a paper with the five main parts of a scientific paper.  The three variables she investigated and reviewed include self-destructiveness, perfectionism, and self-esteem.

Kaitlin Everidge, a Fall 2012 student in Social Psychology, chose to investigate the relationships between creativity, openness to experience, conscientiousness, and perceptions of a painting.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Rhyan Martin conducted a correlational study investigating the connections between burnout, achievement motivation, and lifestyle as it relates to stress levels during the Fall 2012 semester’s Social Psychology course. She reported her procedures and findings in a paper using APA format.

Hannah Prassel’s Fall 2012 honors increment in Social Psychology focused on the relationships between post-traumatic growth, religiosity, and self-esteem.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Morgan Reeves, a Fall 2011 student in Social Psychology, chose to investigate the relationships between procrastination, stress, and perfectionism during the Fall 2011 semester.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Michelle Larberg conducted a correlational study investigating the connections between perfectionism, optimism, and stress levels during the Fall 2011 semester’s Social Psychology course. She reported her procedures and findings in a paper using APA format.

Seaton Stiles’ Fall 2011 honors increment in Social Psychology focused on the relationships between juror biases, motivation orientations, and stereotyped gender characteristics.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Kristen Snyder completed a correlational study investigating three areas of interest during the Fall 2010 Social Psychology class. Her final product included a paper with the five main parts of a scientific paper.  The three variables she investigated and reviewed include trust, repairing relationships, and criticism toward partners.

Mary Alice Birdwhistell conducted a correlational study investigating three areas of interest (gratitude, life satisfaction, and faith maturity) related to her Social Psychology class during the Fall 2006 semester. She reported her procedures and findings in a paper using APA format.

Allison Damron, a student in Social Psychology, chose to investigate the relationships between jealousy, capability of intimacy, and self-esteem during the Fall 2006 semester.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Lacey Lamb conducted a correlational study investigating the connections between loneliness, perfectionism, and body image during the Fall 2006 semester’s Social Psychology course. She reported her procedures and findings in a paper using APA format.

Carrie Summers’ Fall 2006 honors increment in Social Psychology focused on the relationships between trust, self-esteem, and romanticism.  She hypothesized about the variables’ correlations and explained her pattern of findings in a research paper.

Honors Contracts

Hannah Prassel, a student enrolled in Abnormal Psychology in Fall 2013, studied the symptoms, etiology, and treatment of schizophrenia through research and analysis of a published memoir written by an individual diagnosed with the disorder.

Genee Johns, a student enrolled in Abnormal Psychology in Fall 2012, investigated the role of music therapy as an adjunctive treatment for severe mental illness.  She observed music therapy at Eastern State Psychiatric Hospital’s Recovery Mall program, interviewed a music therapist about her work, and reviewed the literature on music therapy.

Katie Rapier, a student enrolled in Abnormal Psychology in Fall 2009, investigated the changes in the personality disorder diagnoses for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.  She then wrote an analytical research paper focusing on the differences between Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder.

Alex Smiley, a student in Psychology and the Law during the Fall 2006 semester, completed a three-section research paper in which she described a movie (Copycat) pertaining to the psycholegal field, analyzed its content for accurate
depictions of relevant course material, and provided  suggestions based on research to make the movie more realistic.

Kelly Kays, a student in Social Psychology during the Spring 2004 semester, completed a study that required her to collect data, analyze it, and write a paper.  The variables she hypothesized about and investigated included interpersonal betrayal, prosocial behavior, and self-esteem.  Her final paper included literature review, methodology, analysis, and discussion sections.

Honors Theses

Ethan Smith completed his honors thesis with Dr. McKenzie during the Spring 2013 semester.  He chose the topic of inattentional blindness, the phenomenon of not perceiving objects that are in plain sight.  He created a video that depicted scenes of inattentional blindness, which was viewed by approximately 100 college undergraduates.  He selected nine personality measures (e.g., imagination, self-monitoring) and tested their relationships with the likelihood of noticing the video’s unexpected environmental changes.  He presented his research results at the Kentucky Psychological Association’s annual conference and the campus poster session for honors students.

Kristen Snyder completed an honors thesis with Dr. McKenzie in 2012.  She investigated the nature of aggression within romantic relationships. Specifically, she conducted research exploring the relationships between narcissism, self-esteem, and emotional/psychological aggression.  Students at Georgetown College currently involved in a romantic relationship constituted her sample.  They completed a packet of 12 questionnaires and surveys evaluating the three variables mentioned above, as well as other related measures, including need for approval, perceptions of strengths and weaknesses within their relationships, and self-absorption.  She presented her research results during a poster session for honors students.

Katie Rapier completed an honors thesis with Dr. Price in 2012. She explored the construct of hope as it is defined by psychological literature as well as students on campus. She investigated how hope correlates with several components of a student’s life, including religiosity and GPA. The research involved a packet of quantitative questionnaires as well as a qualitative interview component. She structured the interviews using pilot participant data and foundational hope short answer questionnaires.  Her results were orally presented during the honors poster session.

Cassie Simpson completed an honors thesis with Dr. Lookadoo in 2009.  She explored topics that applied to women in the Appalachian region, specifically gender roles in this area, stereotypes that exist, and how women from the region react to them.  Furthermore, she studied how women from the Appalachian region have played major roles in both the forefront and background of coal mining communities.  Cassie developed a questionnaire and collected data that investigated how students at Georgetown College viewed women from the Appalachian region.  Cassie’s work led to completion of an independent study as well.



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