Summer 2013 Online Undergraduate Courses

Course Descriptions, Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks and resources will be updated as professors submit their information.  If you have any questions about textbooks and resources, please contact the professor directly by email.

COMM 325 Human Communication and Technology (pending faculty approval)

This course explores the role of electronic and digital technologies in facilitating human communication. It addresses questions concerning how technology affects the way we communicate and how changes in communication and technology may alter our relationships with one another and the technology itself. Topics will include computer-mediated communication, text messaging, social networking, and virtual communities.

Textbooks:
1)  Rainie, L. & Wellman, B. (2012). Networked: The new social operating system. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. ISBN: 978-0262017190
2)  Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books. ISBN: 978-0-465-03146-7

ENG 111 English Composition I

Develops satisfactory college-level proficiency in basic skills of composition and reading comprehension. Students must demonstrate their ability to produce a portfolio of literate, reasonably logical, and perceptive short themes. Grades given are A, B, C, or X (conditional incomplete, to be satisfied by repeating the course). All students must be en-rolled in ENG 111, ENG 112, or ENG 115 until they have successfully completed the freshman writing sequence. For a student to drop ENG 111, the drop slip must be signed by either the Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator. The Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator may waive this continuous enrollment policy as appropriate.

ENG 112 English Composition II

Introduces research techniques and instruction in the principles of documentation and scholarship as well as continues a concern with rhetoric, style, clear thinking, reading comprehension, and successful communication. Orients the student to computer literacy and the use of the library. Prerequisite: ENG 111. All students must be enrolled in ENG 111, ENG 112, or ENG 115 until they have successfully completed the freshman writing sequence. For a student to drop ENG 112, the drop slip must be signed by either the Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator. The Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator may waive this continuous enrollment policy as appropriate.

ENG 298 World Literature Survey II

A study of world literature in translation from antiquity to the 17th. Century.  Prerequisite:  ENG112 or ENG115.

Textbook:  The Bedford Anthology of World Literature, volume 2, compact edition (ISBN:  9780312441548)
Other Requirements:  Internet access, Powerpoint and Word software, RealPlayer audio

MAT 107 College Algebra

A survey of algebraic techniques and of functions. Topics include theory of equations and inequalities, graphs, transformations of functions, inverse functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Can be used as preparation for calculus. Not applicable to a major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite: Math ACT subscore of 19, GSS 105, or bypass credit for GSS105. Students with a grade of C or higher in MAT 109 or MAT 125 (or their equivalents) may not subsequently take this course for credit.  The final exam is proctored by a pastor (or person designated by the pastor) of the student’s choice.  Please visit MAT 107 course site for other important requirements and information.

Resources:  Contact Holly_Hardesty@GeorgetownCollege.edu, or go to MAT 107 Course Site for more information.

MUS 307 History of Rock and Roll

Study of the origins, characteristics, and stylistic development of rock and roll music from the early 1950s through the 1990s.

POS 200 World Politics

This course is an introduction to world politics, designed to familiarize students with the ways in which states, international organizations, and non-state actors interact in the international system. It offers an analysis of the general approaches to world politics, emphasizing current issues and problems. This course is an Area of Inquiry Course

POS 307 Comparative Politics

This course will provide an introduction to key theoretical frameworks, concepts and analytical methods commonly used in comparative politics, including:  the state, political culture, democracy, authoritarianism, development, and national/ethnic identity to name a few.  This course is intended to familiarize students with the most important concepts necessary for the comparison of different political systems and contexts.  Students will learn how to apply this understanding in investigating different countries and regions in the contemporary world.

PSY 111 General Psychology

This general psychology course is designed to provide students with an overview of a wide variety of topics, including research methods, neuropsychology, learning, memory, development, psychological disorders and social psychology.  By the end of this course, students should be able to better evaluate psychological information obtained from scientific journals, the media and the general public and be able to apply this information to themselves and others.

Textbook:  Weiten, W.  (2007).  Psychology Themes and Variations, 7th ed. Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth.

PSY 240 Lifespan Development

Study of human developmental processes from prenatal stages through later adulthood with an examination of the biological, psychological, social, and contextual factors influencing behavior across the lifespan. Registration for this class requires the permission of the instructor.  This course also includes 2 field trips that require a $45 participation fee (total).

Textbook:  Santrock, J.W.  A Topical Approach to Lifespan Development, 6th Edition.  ISBN-13 9780078035135.

PSY 315 Health Psychology

The study of the biological, psychological, and social dimensions involved in health and illness, with emphasis on immune functions, stress, drugs, alcohol, cardiovascular disease, diet, and sexually- transmitted disease. Prerequisite: PSY111.

Textbook:  Taylor, S.E. (2009).  Health Psychology, 7th ed. McGraw-Hill:  New York//NY.

PSY 337 Psychology of Women

This course will provide an overview of classical and contemporary psychological research pertaining to women. It will explore biological and cultural similarities and differences within topics such as behavior, language, emotion, motivation, mental health, and development. The course will include a special focus on women of different ethnic backgrounds. This course carries a Cultural Awareness at Home flag. Prerequisite: PSY111.

Textbook:  Shaw S.M. & Lee, J. (2009).  Women’s Voices Feminist Visions:  Classic and Contemporary Readings, 4th Ed.  Boston, MA:  McGraw-Hill.

PSY 470 Psychology of Slavery

This is an online course except for the 2 class trips where the class will travel together. This course will explore the effects of slavery on the enslaved person, the owner/trafficker, and society in general. Psychological and physical trauma associated with slavery both in the past and present will be explored. More specifically, this will include an examination of the cognitive, behavioral, emotional, social, cultural and physical trauma experienced by enslaved persons. This course will also focus on the psychological effects of slavery on modern society including topics such as dominant and subordinate groups, prejudice, discrimination, oppression, cognitive frameworks and stereotypes, identity formation, and attitudes of apathy. In addition, the class will include a special focus on the Underground Railroad and modern forms of slavery in the world.

The first class trip will be a trip to Underground Railroad sites in Maysville, KY and Ripley, OH. The second class trip will be a trip to the Freedom Center in Cincinnati, OH. There is a class field trip fee of $45 total.

Textbooks: 
1)  Batstone, D. (2010).  Not for Sale:  The Return to the Global Slave Trade and How We Can Fight It. Harper One.
2)  Sher, J. (2011).  Somebody’s Daughter:  The Hidden Story of America’s Prostituted Children and the Battle to Save Them. Chicago Review Press.
3)  Jacobs, H. (2009). Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Restored Version complete and unabridged. CreateSpace.
4)  Davis, A.Y. (2009). Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself:  A New Critical Edition. City Lights.

REL 235 Old Testament Law and History

A study of the content, historical and social context, literary structure, and theological value of the Old Testament books Genesis to Esther.

  • This course serves as an introduction to Old Testament interpretation and a good precursor to upper level (300 or above) Old Testament elective courses
  • The course modules and topics are arranged in a canonical order, that is, they follow the order by which the Old Testament books are arranged in most Bibles (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, etc.). They were preserved in this order to create the effect of a chronological history of events (creation of the world, creation of the Israelite people, history of the Israelite nation, etc.)
  • The bible has probably had the single, most significant influence on Western society of any book ever written, and its content and interpretation still heavily influence the lives of individual believers and non-believers alike across the globe. However, it has also been, and continues to be, one of the most highly misunderstood books ever written.

Textbooks and Resources:
1)  Acquire only one of the following Study Bibles:

    • Berlin, Adele and Marc Zvi Brettler (eds.) The Jewish Study Bible, Featuring The Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. (ISBN: 0-19-529751-27)
    • Attridge, Harold W. (ed.). The HarperCollins Study Bible. Revised Ed.  New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2006.  (ISBN: 006078685X)
    • Coogan, Michael D. (ed.). The New Oxford Annotated Bible. 3rd edition.  Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2001 (ISBN: 0-19-528484-4)
    • Harrelson, Walter J. (ed.) The New Interpreter’s Study Bible. Nashville:  Abingdon Press, 2003.  (ISBN: 0-687-27832-5)
    • Other exegetical study bible, with instructor approval

*Note: Students MUST use an approved study bible for this course! Devotional study bibles are not acceptable, because their study notes are designed for the life of faith for religious believers, rather than primarily being geared toward academic study of ancient Israelite culture.

2)  Coogan, Michael D. Introduction to the Old Testament.  2nd Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.  (ISBN: 978-0-19-537840-5)

3)  Any other required course readings will be provided online as downloadable documents.

REL 253 Religions of the Modern World

An introduction to the history, beliefs, practices, and overarching worldviews of the major religions of the modern world. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the perspective of the adherents of each tradition, rather than using a comparative method to make evaluative judgments about the merits of the various traditions. This course carries a Cultural Awareness Abroad (CAA) flag.

    • This course serves as an introduction to Old Testament interpretation and a good precursor to upper level (300 or above) Old Testament elective courses
    • The course modules and topics are arranged in a canonical order, that is, they follow the order by which the Old Testament books are arranged in most Bibles (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, etc.). They were preserved in this order to create the effect of a chronological history of events (creation of the world, creation of the Israelite people, history of the Israelite nation, etc.)
    • The bible has probably had the single, most significant influence on Western society of any book ever written, and its content and interpretation still heavily influence the lives of individual believers and non-believers alike across the globe. However, it has also been, and continues to be, one of the most highly misunderstood books ever written.

Textbooks and Online Resources:
1)  Van Voorst, Robert E. RELG: World. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2012  [ISBN: 1-111-72620-5]. Students may purchase either the paperback version of the book or the digital version.
2)  Enrollment in the Cengage CourseMate online supplement for above textbook. A course key will be needed to access these resources; this is provided in the course syllabus.
To access CourseMate and enroll in this resource, go to: http://poweron.cengage.com/magellan/TechSupport/ProductHelp.aspx?prodrowid=1-SXF0LJ. Once there, students should click the “Downloads” tab, then click the “Student Registration and Enrollment Clickpath” tab, and finally, click the “Download File” link.
3)  Any other required course readings will be provided online as downloadable documents from the Georgetown College Moodle course shell for REL 253.

SPA 115 Intensive Elementary Spanish

Intensive review of the fundamentals of Spanish, designed for students who have already developed a basic command of the language but are not fully prepared for SPA 102.  Spanish 115 is designed to enable the student to communicate with others in the Spanish language at an elementary level (a novice-high level in accordance with the ACTFL Guidelines, Global Scale A2.1 and A2.2).  Students will master many Spanish grammatical structures and vocabulary items, will acquire skills for meaningful communication appropriate to many situations, and will become aware of a variety of cultural practices. At least two years of high school Spanish required.

Textbook/Resources:
1)  Protagonistas. Vista Higher Learning, 2012.  (Textbook + SupersitePlus Passcode) ISBN 978-1-61767-072-5

  • Passcode is available online if buy a used book with no code: http://vistahigherlearning.com/students/store/spanish-programs/protagonistas-1.html
  • Students may choose to purchase the Supersite Plus code with vText and not buy a physical textbook (ISBN 978-1-61767-220-0); however, they may be required to purchase the book for Spanish 201 at Georgetown, depending on the professor.  Here is the pricing: Student edition, Supersite Plus Code (Supersite + WebSAM+vText) = $225 and Supersite Plus Code (Supersite + WebSAM+vText) no physical textbook $119

2)   A bilingual dictionary:  Collins, Harrap’s, Harper Collins, Larousse, Simon & Schuster or Oxford

Other Requirements:

1)  Headset with microphone (unless your computer does not require one to record) and video camera.  MUST have access to a computer with the ability to video chat.

SOC 373 Class and Stratification

This course is designed to provide a survey of major sociological theories and research on inequality in modern societies, with emphasis on the contemporary United States. We will examine: the distribution of wealth, status, political power, and other valued resources; the structure and effects of class, race, gender, and other modes of social differentiation; social mobility; and the reproduction of inequality. Prerequisite: SOC111 or SOC118.