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Georgetown’s four piano majors play their hearts out in “Piano Christmas”

By MEREDITH RIGBY
Staff Writer

piano e1354906981871 225x300 Georgetown’s four piano majors play their hearts out in “Piano Christmas”

The Georgetonian / MEREDITH RIGBY
Above is pictured Katy Simpson, Meredith Rigby, Chelsea Brown and Genee Johns.

Although the end of the fall semester is a stressful time for music students as well as the student body in general, for pianists it is one of our favorite times. Amid all the bustle of the big final music events, the students of voice recital, the Mystery and Messiah concert and, of course, juries, the Georgetown College piano students put on a nice, laidback recital known as “Piano Christmas.” Four years ago, then freshman Rachel Madden had the idea to start a Christmas recital where the pianists could play their favorite arrangements of Christmas songs, and students could come and relax for half an hour to hear them. It has been an annual event ever since.

This year, “Piano Christmas” was held on Wednesday, Nov. 28. Each of the four piano majors played a solo piece and a duet, and the concert concluded with the two-piano, eight-hand arrangements of “Good Christian Men, Rejoice” and “Joy to the World.” Some of the other pieces included “Silent Night,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “It Came Upon a Midnight Clear.”

Generally, “Piano Christmas” has a reasonably-sized audience of community members and students who simply want to hear some Christmas music. However, this year, we were surprised to watch more and more people filing into the Chapel seats before the recital started. We wondered what could have motivated so many people to attend until we were informed that the event had been accidentally advertised on Tiger Tidbits as a NEXUS event, which it was not. Dr. Hayashida had the students sign their names to a piece of paper and promised to apply to the committee to see if they could get NEXUS credit after all. Most of the students stayed to hear the recital, even after they discovered the mistake.