Theatre

Professors George McGee and Edward Smith (Chair);

Adjunct Professor Jeannie Gambill

Contact the Department

Department of Theatre & Performance Studies
Georgetown College
400 East College Street
Georgetown, KY 40324

Department Site

Email

Students pursuing a major or minor in Theatre and Film engage in a two-step process of investigating both the act of aesthetic performance and the fact of performance in American and global culture. Because theatre and film synthe-size all the arts and humanities, majors and minors will study the art of stage and screen acting, scenic design and stagecraft, directing for the screen and the stage, the history of dramatic representation from Greece to the silver screen, as well as other courses in the department.

 

The Department of Theatre and Film offers course work and extracurricular experiences that foster an appreciation for the art and craft of theatre and film as well as create a challenging, intellectually stimulating, professionally-based, participatory environment that encourages the creative process. The department requires majors to demonstrate:

a broad knowledge of the history, literature and function of the theatre and film , including dramatic texts and motion pictures from various periods and cultures;

the ability to analyze a script from the viewpoint of a performer, design-er/technician, or the director;

basic performance and production skills in theatrical and cinematic productions;

critical thinking skills that connect performances texts and activities to broader cultural, ethical, and historical concerns.

 

Students are encouraged to take part in Maskrafter productions, student productions, departmental reading hours and performances, Alpha Psi Omega (the theatre honorary), as well as other campus organizations such as the Georgetown College Film Club, and other groups dedicated to visual and performing arts.

 

Major

(B.A. Degree) Thirty-three hours required in Theatre and Film including THE 225, 227, 425 and three practica hours (from THE 266, 267, 268, 366, 367, 368); twenty-one additional hours from courses in the major. Allied course will consist of ENG 335.

 

 

Eighteen hours required in Theatre and Film including either THE 225 or 227 and at least one practicum hour (from THE 266, 267, 268, 366, 367, 368), and fourteen additional hours.

 

107. Theatre Appreciation. (2 hours) Introduction to the history and development of performance.             Fall and Spring

 

171 Topics. (3 hours) This course will introduce students to the study of script analysis and how it relates to the creation of live theatrical events and filmed adaptations while exploring a specific topic in one or more of the fields of performance production. The course is open to all students and may be counted toward the Theatre major or minor. This course may be repeated.          Spring

 

220. Performance of Literature. (3 hours) Basic principles of performance, with attention to analysis as preparation for individual and group performance of literature.                                                                                Fall

 

225. Acting. (3 hours) Concentration on the creation of dramatic characters through the development of the performer’s awareness of the physiological, psychological, and mental components inherent in performance as learned through experiential activities. Special fee applies, please see financial planning and expenses section.           Fall and Spring

 

227. Theatre Production. (3 hours) Introduction to theoretical and practical aspects of theatre production: theatre styles, set construction, painting, sound, lighting, costuming, makeup, and theatre management. Special fee applies, please see financial planning and expenses section.                                                                                                       Fall and Spring

 

266 and 267. Practicum in Theatre. (1 hour each) Practical experience in theatre production and performance. Serves as laboratory for the development of production skills and performance experience. No student may present more than two hours of practica credit for a major; one for a minor.                                                                           Fall and Spring

 

268. Production Practicum in Theatre. (1 hour) Implementation of performance/production position. A student may enroll for credit in conjunction with an assigned role in a department production. No student may present more than two hours of practica credit for a major; one for a minor. Prerequisites: Permis-sion of director or technical director and department chair.   Fall and Spring

 

320. Advanced Performance Studies. (3 hours) Concentration on contemporary performance theory and practice in three different genres of solo performance. Prerequisite: THE 220, 225, or consent of instructor. As needed

 

325. Advanced Acting. (3 hours) Students will study further development of physical and emotional instruments; development of improvisational and dramatic scenes. Prerequisite: THE 225.                        Spring

 

320. Advanced Performance Studies. (3 hours) Concentration on contemporary performance theory and practice in three different genres of solo performance. Prerequisite: THE 220, 225, or consent of instructor. As needed

 

325. Advanced Acting. (3 hours) Students will study further development of physical and emotional instruments; development of improvisational and dramatic scenes. Prerequisite: THE 225.                        Spring

 

 

327. Directing. (3 hours) Basic play interpretation; casting-rehearsal procedures, director-actor relationship in analysis and creation procedures; creation of character, and the major tasks of the director. Each student will select, cast, rehearse, and present for class analysis several short dramatic scenes. Prerequisite: THE 225.                              Even Falls

 

347. History of Film. (3 hours) Study of the history of film as a medium of communication, culture, and art through survey of significant films in the history of its development as well as its relationship to theatre and other arts.

Even Springs

 

366. Advanced Theatre Practicum-Performance. (1-3 hours, determined by Faculty Director) Implementation of a performance position. A student may enroll for credit in conjunction with an assigned role in a department production. No student may present more than six hours of practica credit for a major; three for a minor. Prerequisites: Permission of show director and department chair.            Fall and Spring

 

367. Advanced Theatre Practicum – Production. (1-3 hours, determined by Faculty Director) Implementation of a theatre production position. A student may enroll for credit in conjunction with an assigned production position in a department production. No student may present more than six hours of practica credit for a major; three for a minor. Prerequisites: Permission of technical director and department chair.                                                                                                           Fall and Spring

 

368. Advanced Filmmaking Practicum. (1-3 hours, determined by Faculty Director) Implementation of a filmmaking position. A student may enroll for credit in conjunction with an assigned position in a department film production. No student may present more than six hours of practica credit for a major; three for a minor. Prerequisites: Permission of director and department chair.

Fall and Spring

 

407. Creative Dramatics and Children’s Theatre. (2 or 3 hours) Introduction to and overview of the theory and use of creative dramatics and children’s theatre activities in education.                                     Fall and Spring

 

420. Group Performance. (3 hours) Study of and experience in group performance of literature including readers theatre and chamber theatre through adaptation of scripts, direction of and participation in productions for public performance. Prerequisite: THE 220, 225, or by permission of the instructor.                                                                      As needed

 

422. Independent Filmmaking. (3 hours) This course introduces students to the process of conceptualizing and producing independent digital cinema. Students will study and participate in all pre-production, production, and post-production elements of digital motion pictures.                                                                                                                      Spring

 

425. Theatre History. (3 hours) Study of elements of theatre from Ancient Greece to the present, with an emphasis on dramatic literature. Prerequisite: Sophomore or above or permission of instructor.            Odd Springs

428. Production Design. (3 hours) Techniques of production design; research, creative design, and development of working drawings for sets, lighting, and costumes. Prerequisite: THE 227.                               Even Spring

 

440. Independent Study. (1 to 3 hours) With the approval and permission of a member of the Theatre and Film faculty and the chair of the Theatre and Film department, students may engage in reading, research and performance on or in an area of their own choosing.  As needed

 

450. Seminar. (3 hours) In depth study of a topic announced during pre-registration. Prerequisites: Junior standing, THE 220, or 225 and 227, or permission of the instructor.                                                              As needed

 

461. Internship. (1-3 hours) Fieldwork activities in performance-related fields in the area. Prerequisites: THE 220, 225, and 227, or permission of the instructor.                                                                                                              Fall and Spring

 

471. Topics in Theatre and Performance Studies. (3 hours) Specialized study in theatre and performance styles, genres, or issues related to the field.

As needed

Click to See Career Options
AREA EMPLOYERS STRATEGIES

PERFORMING

  • Community theatre
  • Regional theatre
  • Commercial theatre
  • Summer stock theatre
  • Dinner theatre
  • Children’s theatre
  • University theatre groups
  • Touring companies
  • Industrial shows
  • Show groups
  • Amusement and theme parks
  • Television/film studios
  • Radio stations
Participate in acting workshops, courses, and seminars to get advice and experience and to make contacts with others in the field. Join unions or actors’ guilds to stay abreast of opportunities and developments in the field. Get as much acting experience as possible. Perform in school productions, community theater, summer stock, etc. to hone acting skills. Prepare a professional resume that lists your acting experience. Have your resume attached to or printed on the reverse side of an 8″ x 10″ photograph of yourself. Be prepared to make the rounds. Distribute your resume to numerous agencies and offices. Follow up with several personal visits. Be aware that more opportunities exist in large cities such as New York and Los Angeles. Learn about the entertainment industry as a whole: Take courses on entertainment law, business, management, etc. An extensive network of contacts is essential. Get to know people working in your field and related areas.

DIRECTING

  • Direction
  • Technical Direction
  • Casting
  • Stage Management
  • Support Staff
  • Theatre
  • Television/film studios
Participate in the Director’s Guild Training Program. Develop leadership skills through participation in campus and community organizations. Experience with fund-raising is important. Volunteer to do this with local theaters and arts councils. Learn what types of permits and insurance are needed to film or perform in certain areas. Volunteer with directors in local theaters to become familiar with the environment. Serving as an assistant is a great way to get started in this area. Gain directing experience by participating in college productions.

BEHIND THE SCENES

  • Set Design/Construction
  • Property Design
  • Lighting Design
  • Sound Design
  • Costume Design
  • Camera Operation
  • Hair/Make-up
  • Special Effects
  • Wardrobe
  • Prop Management
  • Broadcast Technology
  • Riggers
  • Electricians
  • Community theaters
  • Regional theaters
  • Commercial theaters
  • Summer stock theaters
  • Dinner theaters
  • Children’s theaters
  • University theater groups
  • Touring companies
  • Industrial shows
  • Show groups
  • Amusement and theme parks
  • Television/film studios
  • Radio stations
Learn to work well in a team. Develop a sense of artistry and creativity. Become involved in the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). This organization can give you information about becoming an apprentice as well as help you make valuable contacts. Get experience. Offer your services to school and local theaters. Read industry magazines and books to learn about your area. For sound design: Become familiar with computer technology as digital sound effects and electronic music replace traditional means of sound design. For costume design: Supplement your program with courses in art history and fashion design. Learn about different eras in history in order to recreate on stage. A basic knowledge of history and architecture is helpful.

WRITING

  • Scriptwriting
  • Playwriting
  • Screenwriting
  • Journalism
  • Publicity (Press Agents)
  • Research
  • Theaters
  • Television/film studios
  • Television stations
  • Magazines
  • Newspapers
  • Freelance
Review plays, movies, and TV shows for school or local newspaper. Theatrical press agents publicize and promote theatrical productions. They write press releases, arrange press conferences, and other media events. Take courses in related areas such as public relations, advertising, and business. Reporters spend time on the set absorbing everything. They interview actors as well as craftspeople. Get as much writing experience as possible: Write for the college newspaper, enter playwriting contests, etc. See many different productions and shows. Read variety of scripts to see how scripts are developed. Researchers gather information for movie writers. They may also track down photographs or historical documents to make the film more authentic.

BUSINESS

  • Producing
  • Management
  • Agents
  • Marketing
  • Fundraising and Development
  • Coordination of Volunteers
  • Administration of Arts Programs
  • Box Office Sales
  • Theaters
  • Arts councils
  • Television/film studios
Secretarial/clerical positions in theaters and studios are often stepping-stones to other positions and a good way to make contacts. Take business courses to supplement your program. Obtain a working knowledge of computers. Gain a thorough understanding of theater. Develop skills in leadership, negotiation, budgeting, and fundraising.

EDUCATION

  • Teaching
  • Public and private schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Performing arts centers
Obtain certification for the state in which you wish to teach. Obtain dual certification for more teaching opportunities. Get experience in various areas of theater, as well as working with young people. Obtain a graduate degree to teach on the college level. Develop one or two areas of expertise within theater arts.

General Information

  • Complete an internship or an apprenticeship with a local theater. Participate in summer stock.
  • Network: Talk with people working in the field to find out about jobs and opportunities.
  • Read newspapers and periodicals related to the theater to keep up with new developments. Read the “trades”–magazines and newspapers that report events in the entertainment industry. Read the “Theater” section of daily newspapers to find out about upcoming productions.
  • Get your foot in the door and get involved with productions in any way you can. Be prepared to do various tasks assigned by stage managers or producers.
  • Join professional groups as an opportunity to make contacts.
  • Volunteer with fundraising efforts for the arts.
  • Be aware of scams. Check out the legitimacy of agencies and companies before paying any fees.
  • Be prepared to move to a metropolitan area where more opportunities exist.
  • A career in the arts takes patience, dedication, and luck!
  • Have a back-up plan. Be aware that the unemployment rate for actors hovers around 85%. Develop skills that qualify you for other jobs while you wait for opportunities in acting. Consider pairing theater with another career interest or major to open up more job opportunities.
  • Theater helps students develop verbal and written communication, public speaking, and teamwork skills. These transferable skills are valued by many types of employers.
  • There are many ways to be involved in the theater while pursuing other career options.

Helpful Links

Prepared by the Career Planning staff of Career Services at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
(2005) UTK is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA /ADEA Employer



© 2014 Georgetown College • 400 East College Street, Georgetown, KY 40324 • 1-800-788-9985

Georgetown College admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.