Environmental Science

Professor Rick Kopp, Program Coordinator

Contact the Program

Environmental Science Program
Georgetown College
400 East College Street
Georgetown, KY 40324

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The Environmental Science program provides an interdisciplinary foundation in environmental science within the framework of a liberal arts education.  Because of the broad spectrum of environmental fields, students are provided with flexibility in selecting a course of study that reflects their specific area(s) of interest (i.e. analytical laboratory studies, field-oriented biology, political science, or some combination).  All students in the program are provided with a common foundation (the “Environmental Science Core”) and the opportunity to focus their studies in either the Science or Policy Track.  This B.S. degree program (57 to 59 hours) prepares students for future study and employment leading to several possible career paths in government, industry, research, and academia.  Independent studies are available; an internship is required.

 

Interdisciplinary Major

(B.S. degree) Fifty-seven to fifty-nine hours is required for the major depending on emphasis (Science Track or Policy Track).  The core is required regardless of emphasis. (No minor required)

 

Environmental Science Core (required of all majors):

Note: MAT 111 will also meet the Foundations and Core requirement in mathematics, but other mathematics courses will not meet the Environmental Science requirement.

 

Nine Courses (27  hours) as follows:

BIO 111. Biological Principles

4 hours

BIO 212. Cellular and Molecular Biology  orBIO 214. Organismal Biology

4 hours

BIO 314.  Evolution and Ecology

4 hours

MAT 111. Probability and Statistics

3 hours

ECO 223. Principles of Microeconomics

3 hours

ENV/BIO 330.  Environmental Science & Natural Resources

3 hours

ENV 332. Environmental Science & Policy

3 hours

ENV 450. Seminar

2 hours

ENV 461. Internship

1 hour

 

 

Science Track:

Requires 30 to 31 hours beyond the core (57 to 58 hours total)

 

Four Courses (11 or 12 hours) as follows:

CHE 111. General Chemistry I

4 hours

CHE 112. General Chemistry II

3 hours

CHE 113. General Chemistry Lab II

1 hour

GEL 113. General Geology orPHY 109. Meteorology

4 hours or

3 hours

 

 

A minimum of 16 additional hours. Select from the following:

BIO 300. Marine Biology

3 hours

BIO 311. General Microbiology

4 hours

BIO 316. Plant Taxonomy & Spring Flora

4 hours

BIO 320. Vertebrate Ecology

4 hours

BIO 335. Genetics and Molecular Biology

4 hours

BIO 413. Freshwater Biology

4 hours

CHE 201. Organic Chemistry I

3 hours

CHE 202. Organic Chemistry Lab I

1 hour

CHE 305. Quantitative Analysis

4 hours

CHE 309. Organic Chemistry II

3 hours

CHE 310. Organic Chemistry Lab II

1 hour

CHE 315. Spectroscopy

4 hours

CHE 337. Environmental Chemistry

2 hours

CHE 339. Environmental Chemistry Lab

1 hour

 

 

One Additional Course (3 hours)

Select one upper-level course (numbered 300 or higher) from the Policy Track outside of the natural and physical sciences.

 

Environmental Policy Track:

Requires 31 to 32 hours beyond the core (58 to 59 hours total).

 

One course (4 hours).

CHE 111. General Chemistry I

4 hours

GEL 113. General Geology

4 hours

 

 

Two courses (6 hours).

ECO 337. Environmental Economics

3 hours

PHI 345. Environmental Philosophy & Ethics

3 hours

SOC 355. Environment and Sustainability

3 hours

 

 

 

Six courses (18 hours) with no more than 3 courses from any one discipline.  Whichever course was not selected from the previous block (ECO 337, PHI 345, or SOC 355) may be included here.

BUA 210. Principles of Accounting I

3 hours

BUA 211. Principles of Accounting II

3 hours

ECO 221. Principles of Macroeconomics

3 hours

PHI 335. United States Congress

3 hours

POS 305. Urban Government

3 hours

POS 309. State Government

3 hours

POS 315. Public Administration

3 hours

POS 335. Legislative Process

3 hours

POS 409. Kentucky Government

3 hours

POS 430. International Political Economy

3 hours

SOC 405. Development and Globalization

3 hours

SOC 415. Food and Society

3 hours

 

 

One Additional Course (3-4 hours).

BIO 300. Marine Biology

3 hours

BIO 311. General Microbiology

4 hours

BIO 316. Plant Taxonomy and Spring Flora

4 hours

BIO 320. Vertebrate Ecology

4 hours

BIO 335                                          . Genetics and Molecular Biology

4 hours

BIO 413                                                                 . Freshwater Biology

4 hours

 

 

330. Environmental Science and Natural Resources. (3 hours) A study of the principles of environmental science and their application to current issues. Emphasis is placed on the use of natural resources (energy, mineral, water, and biological) and the consequences of that use (resource depletion, water and air pollution, hazardous and non-hazardous waste). Prerequisites: BIO 111 and junior or senior standing. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 314.                                                       Even Springs

 

332. Environmental Science and Policy. (3 hours) A study of the principles of environmental science and their application to current issues.  Emphasis is placed on addressing how risk is assessed, managed and communicated, how U.S. environmental policy has developed, and how regulations are formed, implemented, and enforced. The class will also discuss selected international policies, particularly those of the United Nations and Europe. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and junior or senior standing. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 314.

Even Falls

 

440. Independent Study. (1-3 hours) An independent research project supervised by a faculty member in an appropriate discipline. Prerequisites: BIO 111, Sophomore classification, consent of supervising professor, and consent of the Environmental Science Program Coordinator.                                                                                                      As needed

 

450. Seminar. (2 hours) Development of library research and writing skills. Current environmental issues will be discussed, and students will prepare a review paper and make an oral presentation on their review topic. Prerequisite: Senior classification.           As needed

 

461-462. Environmental Science Intern Program. (1-3 hours for each course) Field experience in any area of environmental science education, management or research conducted through a governmental or private agency. Prerequisites: declared major in Environmental Science and permission of the Environmental Science Program Coordinator. As needed

Click to See Career Options
AREA EMPLOYERS STRATEGIES

PLANNING

  • Air Quality
  • Aviation
  • Building/Zoning
  • Land-Use
  • Consulting
  • Recreation
  • Transportation
  • Water Resources
  • Federal, state, regional, and local government
  • Corporations
  • Consulting firms
  • Banks
  • Real estate development companies
  • Law firms
  • Architectural firms
  • Market research companies
  • Colleges and universities
  • Nonprofit groups
Get on planning boards, commissions, and committees. Have a planning specialty (transportation, water resources, air quality, etc.). Master communication, mediation and writing skills. Network in the community and get to know “who’s who” in your specialty area. Develop a strong scientific or technical background. Diversify your knowledge base. For example, in areas of law, economics, politics, historical preservation, or architecture.

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION

  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Tourism
  • Law Regulation
  • Compliance
  • Political Action/Lobbying
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Public and private elementary, middle, and high schools
  • Two-year community colleges
  • Four-year institutions
  • Corporations
  • Consulting firms
  • Media
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Political Action Committees
Master public speaking skills. Learn certification/licensure requirements for teaching public K-12 schools. Develop creative hands-on strategies for teaching/ learning. Publish articles in newsletters or newspapers. Learn environmental laws and regulations. Join professional associations and environmental groups as ways to network. Become active in environmental political organizations.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Hydrology
  • Logistics
  • Planning
  • Recycling
  • Transportation
  • Compliance
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private waste management firms
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
Take some scientific or engineering courses. Choose an unusual material and think of creative ways to recycle or reuse it.

HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

  • Hydrogeology
  • Quality Control
  • Risk Assessment
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Public and Environmental Health
  • Industrial Hygiene
  • Law
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Geology
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Planning
  • Compliance
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private companies that generate hazardous waste in production
  • Hazardous waste management firms
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
Consider double major in hard science or engineering. Attend public meetings on this issue. Get laboratory experience. Gain computer expertise. Work in government office or regulatory agency. Get experience with technical writing. Get involved with local chapters of citizen watch groups. Become familiar with Superfund and its activities.

AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT

  • Engineering
  • Planning
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Environmental Quality
  • Analysis
  • Meteorology
  • Risk Assessment
  • Safety and Health
  • Management
  • Toxicology
  • Project Development Compliance
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private industry
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
Develop a specific skill in the areas of engineering, chemistry or laboratory work. Work at state and local agencies as a way to start an air quality career.

WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

  • Aquatic Ecology
  • Aquatic Toxicology
    Law
  • Biology
  • Civil/Environmental
  • Engineering
  • Hydrogeology and Hydrology
  • Drinking Water Supply and Treatment
  • Waste Water Treatment
  • Groundwater Protection
  • Surface Water Management
  • Estuary Management
  • Wetlands Protection
    Compliance
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Corporations
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Treatment plants
Get a strong chemistry background. Become familiar with high-tech tools. Develop computer skills. Focus on a specific technical field. Obtain laboratory skills.

LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION

  • Biology
  • Ecology
  • Planning
  • Geographic Information Systems
  • Preserve Management
  • Law
  • Natural Resource Management
  • Soil Conservation
  • Land Acquisition
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Indian nations
  • Utilities and timber companies
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Land trust organizations such as The Nature Conservancy or Trust for Public Land
Get a solid background in the basic sciences while obtaining a broad-based education. Obtain legal, real estate, and financial skills through coursework, internships or part-time jobs. Volunteer through the Student Conservation Association (SCA) and hold an office. Keep up with new funding sources. Consider law school for careers as counsel to environmental organizations.

FISHERY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT

  • Aquaculture
  • Botany
  • Data Management
  • Biology
  • Hatchery Management
  • Marine Biology
  • Ecology
  • Education
  • Research
  • Planning
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Marine sport fisheries
  • Utility companies
  • Developers
  • Timber companies
  • Wildlife ranges
  • Scientific foundations
  • Zoological parks
  • Hunting and fishing clubs
  • Consulting firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
Get a broad scientific education. Obtain skills in areas such as planning, administration, communications, and negotiation through coursework, internships, or part-time jobs. Get experience and skills in computers, statistics and computer modeling. Join the Peace Corps as a segue way into federal government positions. Get on government agencies’ job registers.

PARKS AND OUTDOOR RECREATION

  • Administration and
  • Management
  • Law Enforcement
  • Recreation Planning
  • Natural Resource Management
  • Research
  • Site Operations and
  • Maintenance
  • Ecotourism
  • Direct Mail Merchandising
  • National Park Service
  • Federal agencies
  • State, county or city parks
  • Resorts
  • Marinas
  • Privately owned facilities
  • Nonprofit organizations
Get a broad-based education that will develop both technical and interpersonal skills. Gain expertise in additional areas such as communications, writing, fund-raising, negotiation, and computer applications. Obtain working knowledge of a foreign language such as Spanish.

FORESTRY

  • Consulting
  • Entomology
  • Hydrology
  • Natural Resource
  • Management
  • Planning
  • Research
  • International Forestry
  • Urban Forestry
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Consulting firms
  • Timber companies
  • Nonprofit organizations
Obtain skills with computers, statistics, and accounting through coursework, internships or part-time jobs. Develop good communication and public relations skills. Get a minor or double major in a technical area (soil science, wildlife or surveying) or in an arts and science area (business, economics, political science or computer science).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  • Private firms
  • Corporations
  • Federal and State government agencies such as: Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Justice and Attorney General Office
    Nonprofit organizations such as Green Action and Natural Resources Defense Council
Law degree required.

General Information about Environmental Science

  • Environmental studies and environmental science differ from each other in the amount of science course work needed.
  • Environmental studies provides a broad base of hard sciences as well as liberal arts or social science coursework.
  • Environmental science incorporates hard sciences and environmental sciences.
  • Choice depends upon career focus, for example, administration or policy-making versus technical areas or research.
  • Combine liberal arts skills with analytical skills to increase employability. Formally, obtain a double major in these areas or minor in one of these areas. Informally, obtain these skills through internships, co-ops, volunteer work, summer jobs or independent research projects.
  • Be familiar with current environmental laws and regulations. Stay up-to-date with changing environmental legislation.
  • Join environmental science-related professional associations; read related literature and journals to keep up with new developments.
  • Attend seminars, conferences and workshops sponsored by professional associations or public interest groups.
  • Network and get to know people who are working in an environmental science area of interest.
  • Research agencies/organizations of interest before applying for a position.
  • Learn local, state and federal government job application procedures.
  • Obtain graduate degree for job security/advancement.

Helpful Links

Prepared by the Career Planning staff of Career Services at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
(2005) UTK is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA /ADEA Employer



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