Art

Professor Boris Zakić; Associate Professors Juilee Decker (Chair)

and Daniel Graham; Assistant Professor Darrell Kincer;

Adjunct Instructor Leah Crews Castleman

Director of Art Galleries and Curator of Collections: Laura Stewart

Contact the Department

Art Department
Georgetown College
400 East College Street
Georgetown, KY 40324

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The visual art major is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the history of art, foundational skills in traditional and digital media, and advanced study in art history and art studio. The major provides an introduction to art history and a variety of media and processes that may be catered to suit particular student interest and career goals. The flexibility of the art major affords students the opportunity to pursue other academic interests, including a departmental major in another academic area.

Students completing the BA in art (with an area of emphasis in art history or art studio) will develop skills in formal and contextual analysis, gain knowledge of art history from prehistoric to the present, demonstrate technical skills, and produce a capstone project that is studio or research-based. Students with an em-phasis in art studio will finish their program of study with a body of work that is documented through a portfolio. Students with an emphasis in art history will prepare and present a research paper that incorporates art historical or curatorial methodologies and utilizes primary research.

The art history major will demonstrate:

  • skills in formal and contextual analysis;
  • deepened knowledge of world art history;
  • knowledge and application of the methods of art history;
  • familiarity with foundational skills in 2-d, 3-d, and/or digital media.

These skills enable the art history major to undertake a research project during the final semester of coursework when enrolled in ART 455 therein conducting, writing, presenting, and defending an original research or curatorial project that evidences skill with primary literature and current art historical or curatorial methods. ART 455 Senior Thesis serves as the capstone course for the Art Major. See description below.

The studio art major will demonstrate:

  • skills in formal and contextual analysis;
  • a broad knowledge of world art history;
  • the ability to relate one’s own creative ideas and intentions to the wider con-temporary and historical context;
  • technical skills showing knowledge of traditional and digital media thereby enabling the student to execute work with competence and clarity.

These skills enable the studio major to develop a body of work during the final semester of coursework when enrolled in ART 455, therein creating, exhibiting, and defending a consistent and relevant body of work based on mature concepts and well-developed ideas. ART 455 Senior Thesis serves as the capstone course for the Art Major. See description below.

Students majoring in visual art find career opportunities in a wide variety of professional fields, including teaching in public or private schools; management of cultural programs in city, state, or federal government agencies; museums, galleries and other cultural institutions; advertising and design studios. In addition, graduates start small businesses and begin independent professional practices. Our undergraduate major prepares students for graduate study in fine arts, curatorial, and art history programs. Certification in art education (P-12) is also available. Please direct inquiries about Art Education to the Department Chair no later than the end of the freshman year.

Major

(B.A. degree) Thirty-six hours required, including nine hours in art history, nine hours in studio foundations, nine hours in area of specialization, five hours elective, and four hours of senior thesis work. Twelve hours must be taken at the 300-level or above.

Nine hours in art history may be taken from: 216, 217, 414, 416, or 470; nine hours in foundations may be taken from: 115, 117, 118, or 234; nine hours in an area of specialization (art history or art studio); five hours elective may be selected from any art courses; and four hours senior thesis.

Minor

Twenty-one hours required, including six hours in art history, six hours in studio foundations, six hours in an area of specialization, and three hours elective.

Six hours in art history may be taken from: 216, 217, 414, 416, or 470; six hours in foundations may be taken from 115, 117, 118, or 234; six hours in an area of specialization (art history or art studio); and three hours elective (any art offering).

Note: Students seeking education certification should consult with the art department chair.

Advising Notes

ART 170 (Topics in Art) is a course open to all students, regardless of major. The topic emphasized in the course varies and changes every semester. Past topics have included “The Art of Greece,” “Experiencing the Museum,” and “Arts of Asia.” Please consult the course schedule to see the topic being offered during the corresponding semester. This course is primarily lecture, although some sections of the course engage students in art experiences and studio work as well.

Students who intend to major or minor in art are advised to take at least one art history and one studio course during their freshman year. Of these classes, ART 115 or 117 must be taken as the prerequisite for painting; ART 234 is the prerequisite for digital and web design courses; and ART 118 is required before advanced 3-d work. Moreover, all art majors should take both art history survey courses by the close of the sophomore year.

The Art Department offers the following Flag courses which are part of the Foundations and Core Program: ART 118, 120, 234, and 250 carry the Q flag. ART 250 carries the W flag in addition to the Q. On occasion, ART 170 carries a flag. See the semester schedule for details and consult the description of the Foundations and Core Program at the beginning of the catalog.

Course Offerings

Course offerings include art education, art history, curatorial studies, drawing, design, graphic design, painting, photography, printmaking, and 3-d practices. Cross-listed courses include ART 170 Topics in Art, often taught as part of the Freshman Foundations Program and ART/WST 470 Women and Art (in conjunction with the Women’s Studies Program).

 

115. Drawing. (3 hours). This foundation level art course deals with the basics of drawing using both traditional media and innovative techniques. The drawing approaches will range from representational to experimental. This course is suggested as a prerequisite for ART 232 Painting I. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.    Fall and Spring

 

117. Design Basics and Color. (3 hours) This foundation level art course deals with basic topics of visual structure, the elements of design, materials and design terminology, and color theory. This course is suggested as a prerequisite for ART 232 Painting I. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                            Fall

 

118. Introduction to Three Dimensional Design and Ceramics. (3 hours) This studio course addresses the fundamental concepts of sculpture and other three-dimensional practices. Working with a variety of materials including paper, wire, metal, and clay, students will have the opportunity to examine the formal elements of three-dimensional forms through hands-on experience. In this course students will observe the work of others in the studio environment; explore a broad repertoire of media possibilities; and critically analyze works. This course carries the Quantitative (Q) Flag in the Foundations and Core Program. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                                                                     Spring

 

120. Photography. (3 hours) This course explores both traditional darkroom and digital photography practices. Students will be instructed in the operation of the camera, subject and compositional considerations, image refinement, and a variety of printing methods. All students will receive help in expanding their knowledge and vision for the photographic medium as well as preparation for further development of personal photographic work. This course carries the Quantitative (Q) Flag in the Foundations and Core Program. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.   Fall and Spring

 

170. Topics in Art. (1 – 3 hours) This course provides the opportunity to engage in visual and contextual analysis of art while investigating a topic of interest in the area of art history, art studio, or curatorial studies. The course is open to all students and may be counted toward the art major or minor. This course may be repeated, provided a different topic is taken. Topics include: Picasso’s Guernica Then & Now; Design via Photography; The Grand Tour; Arts of Asia; and Art Experiment. This course may carry a Flag in the Foundations and Core Program. Consult the semester schedule for this information as well as the topic under study. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses.                                                                          Fall and Spring

 

216. Survey of Art History I. (3 hours) ART 216 introduces the basic concepts of visual and contextual analysis in the form of an historical survey of paintings, sculpture, architecture and other art forms from prehistoric and ancient cultures to circa 1450 CE. Art history explores how and why works of art and visual culture function in context, paying attention to issues such as religious identity, politics, patronage, and gender while reflecting, too, on the ways in which these works are mediated and understood by viewers across time. The course is taught from the Western perspective with some attention paid to content from beyond the Western tradition. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                            Fall

 

217. Survey of Art History II. (3 hours) ART 217 is the second half of a year-long introductory survey of art history which introduces the basic concepts of visual and stylistic analysis in the form of an historical survey of paintings, sculpture, architecture, and other art forms from 1450 CE to the present day. Like 216, this course emphasizes understanding how and why works of art and visual culture function in context, paying attention to issues such as religious identity, politics, patronage, and gender while reflecting, too, on the ways in which these works are mediated and understood by viewers across time. This course interrogates the role of the artist more explicitly than ART 216. The course is taught from the Western perspective with some attention paid to content beyond the Western tradition. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                        Spring

 

232. Painting I. (3 hours) This art course deals with the basics of painting using traditional media and experimental techniques in which color and composition problems will be assigned. A broad range of approaches and styles are addressed, and one’s personal creative development will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 115 or 117 or permission of instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                                            Spring

 

234. Survey of Computer Art Applications. (3 hours) An introductory study in the technical, creative, and conceptual aspects of graphic design and digital imaging. Although no one area will be mastered in this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of Adobe’s Creative Suite with emphasis in Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. This course is a prerequisite for upper level digital courses and is recommended for all art majors and minors. This course carries the Quantitative (Q) Flag in the Foundations and Core Program and the higher-level requirement in the Fine Arts Area of Inquiry. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.   Fall and Spring

 

250. Art History Methods. (3 hours) This course serves as an introduction to the concepts, methods, and issues in art history and art criticism. Students will explore several art historical methods as they intensively examine a work or series of works first hand. In consultation with instructor, students choose to research a work(s) of art in the GC Archives, Permanent Collection, or the Dr. Donald L. and Dorothy Jacobs Gallery. Prerequisite: one course in art history or sophomore standing. This course carries the Quantitative (Q) and Writing (W) Flags in the Foundations and Core Program. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                                                                                                      Spring

 

300. Printmaking. (3 hours) This course introduces students to basic methods of traditional printmaking. Each student will complete individual assignments utilizing multiple printmaking media including monoprint, paper lithography, and silkscreen. Demonstrative instruction will be given in woodcut, etching, engraving, and multiple transfer techniques. Students will learn how to identify various types of papers and will become familiar with a number of fundamental print concepts such as editioning, registration, group problem solving, and collaboration. Students will also receive the fundamental processes found in bookmaking. Prerequisite: ART 115 or 117. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                         Spring

 

302. Curatorial Studies. (3 hours) Students engage in individual and group projects to further their understanding of art historical and curatorial activities in addition to collections care and management through reading, discussions, and the planning, design, and installation of exhibitions. One project includes the student collaboration in preparing an exhibition that focuses on an aspect of Georgetown College’s history. The exhibition is held in conjunction with the college’s Homecoming. Students also learn the basics of art handling, condition reporting, and the professional responsibilities of the curator. Students collaborate with peers and work closely with faculty, the Director of Art Galleries and Curator of Collections, and the College Archivist throughout the semester. This course is experience-based and employs collaborative learning. For this reason, students are not permitted to enroll in this course with the “Pass/Fail” option. Please see the course instructor for clarification. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                Fall

 

313. Art Education. (2 or 3 hours) The course is designed to address the needs of education majors while providing opportunities to develop skills in pedagogy, leadership and advocacy, and personal inquiry in visual arts. In this course, stu-dents will: understand the elements of art and principles of design and will be able to critique a work of art according to universally recognized criteria; create original works of art using a variety of media and styles; and write and present original lesson plans incorporating visual arts and Kentucky’s core content. No prerequisite, however enrollment in the Teacher Education Program and/or declaration of art major/minor is recommended. This course offers students a Service Learning opportunity. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.     Fall and Spring

 

315. Advanced Drawing. (3 hours) This course is an advanced study in the technical skill of drawing achieved in ART 115 and offers further development through exploration of varied mediums including charcoal, ink wash, reductive drawing, and conté crayon. The course will investigate still life, anatomical drawing, and large-scale drawing, among other subjects. Students are expected to come to the course equipped with drawing experience and knowledge of mark making in historical or contemporary terms. Therefore, the prerequisites are ART 115 (Drawing) plus one other art course. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses.    Even Falls

 

330. 3-D Practices. (3 hours) This course is an exploration of materials and techniques leading toward conceptual advancement and an investigation of personal aesthetics. The assignments in each course will range from exercises to fully developed works based in conceptual research. 3-D Practices are offered in the four major fields of sculptural pursuits: Furniture making (focusing on, but not limited to, wood as a material and furniture as a medium); Metal works (a survey of fabrication practices including, but not limited to, welding, casting, and blacksmithing); Ceramics (a course that investigates clay as a medium and a conceptual context); and Performance and Installation (using the medium of the body, working with spatial relationships, and creating installation works). This course is repeatable. Prerequisite: ART 118 or permission of instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses.           Fall and Spring

 

332. Painting II. (3 hours) This advanced painting course further explores composition and painting techniques while moving toward a greater independence and personal development for the student. Prerequisite: ART 232 or per-mission of instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                        Fall and Spring

 

336. Intermediate Graphic Design. (3 hours) This course serves as an in-depth study of problem-solving, conceptual development, layout and implementation of text and graphics explored primarily through Adobe Illustrator, along with Photoshop and InDesign. Students work with complex design projects and problems that encourage development beyond basic skills and experimentation with creative solutions. Prerequisite: ART 234. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.      Odd Falls

 

338. Intermediate Digital Imaging. (3 hours) This course serves as an in-depth study of digital image manipulation explored primarily through Adobe Photoshop, along with Illustrator and InDesign. Students create multiple projects, addressing both technical and conceptual issues while exploring various solutions to visual and digital design problems. Prerequisite: ART 234. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                   Even Falls

 

370. Topics in Studio Art. (1 – 3 hours) This studio art course addresses specialized mediums, techniques, and/or themes. Topics include: Sketchbooks, Portrait and Lighting, Storytelling and Sequential Art, and Alternate Photographic Processes. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites may apply; consult instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                 Fall and Spring

375. Tutorial Topics. (3 hours) The study of a special topic in art history or art theory using the one-on-one tutorial method of instruction adapted from humanities courses at the University of Oxford, one of the leading universities in the world. The course is required as preparation for students interested in pursuing study in art history through the Oxford Program at Georgetown College. Please consult the art department chair for current offerings. Prerequisite: one course in art and permission of the instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                                   As needed

 

414. Modern Art History. (3 hours) This course surveys developments in nineteenth and twentieth-century art and architecture, beginning with the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 and concluding around 1970, with the advent of col-or-field painting and minimalism. Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical and critical issues in addition to the historical, intellectual, and socioeconomic changes that are reflected or addressed in the works of artists and architects. Prerequisite: ART 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                                            Fall

 

416. Contemporary Art History. (3 hours) This course is a continuation of issues and ideas of art history and criticism presented in ART 414 Modern Art History. In ART 416, students survey developments in twentieth and twenty-first century art and architecture (1970-present). Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical and critical issues in addition to the historical, intellectual, and socioeconomic changes that are reflected or addressed in the works of artists and architects. Prerequisite: one course in art history or permission of the instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.             Spring

 

432. Advanced Painting. (3 hours) The student will provide a statement of goals to the instructor who will act in an advisory capacity. Independent thinking and technical development are emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 332 or permission of instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses

section.                                                                                                       Fall and Spring

 

435. Web Design. (3 hours) Students will learn interactive techniques and interface design using HTML code, CSS, JavaScript, Dreamweaver and Photoshop. This course will be an in-depth study of interactive design for the web that focuses on skill use, thematic development, visual consistency and efficiency. The skills addressed in this course will enable students to develop an array of websites utilizing basic HTML, blogs, or content management systems. Prerequisite: ART 234. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses. Even Falls

 

440. Independent Study. (1 – 3 hours) Students may select any studio area or art history or art education topic for research and development. For each hour of credit, a student must complete 45 contact hours. Students must consult with faculty for application and approval in the semester prior to taking the course. They must complete paperwork as well as seek approval from the Office of the Provost. This course may be repeated. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.          As needed

455. Senior Thesis. (4 hours) Students completing the BA in art (with an area of emphasis in art history or art studio) will develop skills in formal and contextual analysis, demonstrate knowledge of art history, demonstrate technical skills, and produce a capstone project that addresses art historical, curatorial, or studio contexts. The purpose of the course is to assist students in developing a portfolio and thesis. For art history majors, participation in the senior research preview and subsequent research review precede enrollment in this course. During the course, the student conducts, writes, presents, and defends an original research or curatorial project that evidences skill with primary literature and current art historical or curatorial methods. A resume and an art historical statement complete the portfolio. A public presentation and an oral defense are required. For art studio majors, participation in the senior preview exhibition and subsequent portfolio review precede enrollment in this course. During the course, the student develops, exhibits, supports and/or defends a consistent and relevant body of work based upon mature concepts and well-developed ideas relevant to his/her study.  A resume, artist’s statement, thesis statement, and documentation of the exhibited work comprise the portfolio. An oral defense is required. Prerequisite and additional note: Because the course is the Capstone Course for the Art Major, ART 455 must be taken during the final semester of residence. Before admission into course, students must pass a portfolio review in April or October (the semester prior to enrolling into the course). Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses.                       Fall and Spring

461. Internship in Visual Arts. (1-3 hours) Students may undertake professional involvement in an ad agency, studio, gallery, collection, archive, or organization as a means of preparing for a career goal or further studies in the visual arts. For each hour of credit, a student must complete 50 contact hours. Students must consult with faculty for application and approval in the semester prior to taking the course. They must complete paperwork and register with the Center for Calling and Career. This course may be repeated. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.                  As needed

470. Special Topics in Art History. (3 hours) This course is an upper-level art history course that aims to engage students in discussion about and research within the disciplines of art history and curatorial studies. Topics tend to be focused, building upon content that may have been addressed briefly in other art history courses. Topics include: Women and Art; Public Art; The End of Impressionism; New Museum Theory; The Art of Collecting; and several other subjects, themes, or approaches. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: one course in art history or permission of the instructor. Special fee applies, please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.    Spring

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