The languages and literature of ancient Greece and Rome are the foundation of virtually every discipline in the liberal arts and sciences. The study of Greek and/or Latin, and of Greek and Roman authors in English translation, will deepen a student’s understanding of any field.

Interdisciplinary Minor

Twenty-one hours required, to include the following:

  • Latin or Greek fourth-semester Reading Course 3 hours
    • LAT 202, GRK 202, or REL 204
  • Additional Latin or Greek courses 6 hours
    • to be selected from the following:
      • LAT 101*-102, 201, 202
      • REL 103*-104, 203, 204 (New Testament Greek)
      • GRK 201, 202
      • *LAT 101 or REL 103 counts only if it is the student’s second Classical language.
  • Related Courses (taught in English) 12 hours
    • to be selected from the following:
      • ART 216: Survey of Art History I
      • PHI 201: History of Philosophy I
      • ENG 314: Epic Poetry
      • CLA 314: Mythology in Greek and Roman Literature
      • CLA 316: Ancient Drama
      • CLA 370: Topics in Classical Literature (Topics to include: “Women and Gender in Antiquity” and “From Lyric to Satire: Greek and Roman Poetry”)
      • HIS 412: Ancient History
      • POS 400: Classical Political Theory
    • Other courses by approval of Program Coordinator

Courses

314. Mythology in Greek and Roman Literature. (3 hours) Selected readings of Greek and Roman literature (in English translation) with mythological themes. Spring

316. Ancient Drama. (3 hours) Selected readings in Greek and Roman traged and comedy (in English translation), combining literary study with attention to stagecraft and cultural context. Spring

370. Topics in Classical Literature. (3 hours) Selected readings in Greek and Roman Literature in English translation. Topics will include, but not be limited to, “From Lyric to Satire: Greek and Roman Poetry,” and “Women and Gender in Antiquity.” Spring as needed

378. Tutorial topics. (1-3 hours) Special topics in classics; use of one-on-one tutorial method of instruction adapted from humanities courses at Oxford and Cambridge Universities. As needed