Courses numbered 400 to 499 are intended primarily for undergraduates, but may be taken by graduate students upon the approval of the chairpersons of the departments in which the course is offered and the Associate Dean for Graduate Education. A 400 level course taken for graduate credit requires additional work beyond a regular undergraduate course. Courses numbered 500 and above are open only to those admitted for graduate study. The College reserves the right to cancel any course when the registration is not sufficient to warrant its continuance.

Art (ART)

524. Digital Imaging. (3 hours) An introduction to the aesthetics, creative, and technical aspects of digital imaging. Students will gain a basic understanding of Adobe’s Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign) and other programs. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students and as an elective in the Instructional Technology Endorsement. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

526. Digital Media in the Arts and Humanities Classroom. (3 hours) Digital media can play an important role in the arts and humanities classroom. This course will introduce students to the technical knowledge and skills needed to produce high quality digital media (graphics, video, audio) products to use in the P-12 classroom. In addition, students will explore practical ways to integrate digital media into arts and humanities content. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students and as an elective in the Instructional Technology Endorsement. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

540. Independent Study in Art. (1-3 hours) The student may select, in consultation with art faculty member(s), a topic for research or development in museum education, art studio, or art history. This course may be repeated. This course may count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students and may be eligible as an elective in the Instructional Technology Endorsement. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

570. Topics in Art. (2-3 hours) An in-depth study of a selected topic in art and museum education, art studio, or art history. The course will carry a subtitle denoting its emphasis. This course may be repeated. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

Biology (BIO)

500. Environmental Education. (2-3 hours) A scientific, aesthetic and educational examination of humankind and the environment through a study of people, their place in nature and the consequences of interaction with the various components of the environment. This course is designed to give the classroom teacher an ecological basis to make knowledgeable decisions and function more effectively as an enlightened teacher.

540. Independent Study in Biology. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in Biology. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in Biology. (2-3 hours)

Chemistry (CHE)

510. Classroom Demonstration of Chemistry and Physics Principles. (3 hours) This course is designed for elementary, middle, and secondary teachers who want to learn new practical methods for doing science in the classroom. Topics will include the scientific method, states of matter, chemical and physical changes, combustion reactions, solubility, acids and bases, polymers, household chemicals, density, pressure, waves, light and lasers, and refraction. Students will observe demonstrations and discuss the chemical and physical principles behind them, perform demonstrations, and design new demonstrations.

540. Independent Study in Chemistry. (1-3 hours)

570. Topics in Chemistry. (2-3 hours)

Communication and Media Studies (COMM)

510. Communication in the Classroom. (3 hours) A survey of the theory and practice of teacher-student communication in a variety of classroom settings.

515. Children’s Theater and Creative Drama. (3 hours) The theory and application of creative dramatics and children’s theater in education.

520. Using and Producing Video in the Classroom. (3 hours) An introduction to approaches and strategies for using and producing video in the classroom through reading, discussion, interactive demonstrations, and presentation of a final video product.

525. Leadership for Change. (2-3 hours) An overview of leadership theories, focusing on the examination of leadership as a communication process involved in developing and sharing a vision, making and implementing decisions, and managing conflict.

540. Independent Study in Communications and Media Studies. (1-3 hours)

570. Topics in Communication and Media Studies. (2-3 hours)

Computer Science (CSC)

510. Digital Audio Techniques. (3 hours) An introduction to digital audio file creation, manipulation and storage with respect to applications in web environments, multimedia presentations, and for other professional purposes. Topics will include converting analog media to digital formats, noise reduction, multi-track recording, crossfading, editing, and other related subjects.

514. MIDI Computer Music. (3 hours) Study of the essential components of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) technology: synthesizer and sequencer capabilities; sequence recording and editing. Prerequisites: ability to read music; basic instrumental keyboard competency.

516. Digital Video Techniques. (3 hours). An introduction to digital video file creation, editing and storage with respect to applications in web environments, multimedia presentations, and for other professional purposes. Topics will include incorporating video transitions and effects, importing photos or artwork, importing and editing sound, adding titles and credits, converting visual analog formats to digital, and other related subjects. The course will use Windows Movie Maker software.

522. Implementing STEM in the Classroom with Robotics. (3 hours). This course will cover robotics concepts through readings, demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Online activities will introduce robotics concepts and define how robotics fit into Kentucky Core Content. In class, students will learn how to create and program robots using the Lego Mindstorms Robotics system and will apply the robotics skills learned, by working with a group of middle-school children participating in a Lego Mindstorms summer camp.

524. Digital Imaging. (3 hours) An introduction to the aesthetics, creative, and technical aspects of digital imaging. Students will gain a basic understanding of Adobe’s Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign) and other programs. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, and art students and as an elective in the Instructional Technology Endorsement. Special fee applies; please see Financial Planning and Expenses section.

526. Digital Media in the Arts and Humanities Classroom. (3 hours) Digital media can play an important role in the arts and humanities classroom. This course will introduce students to the technical knowledge and skills needed to produce high quality digital media (graphics, video, audio) products to use in the P-12 classroom. In addition, students will explore practical ways to integrate digital media into arts and humanities content. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students and as an elective in the instructional Technology endorsement.

540. Independent Study in Computer Science. (1-3 hours)

570. Topics in Computer Science. (2-3 hours)

Education (EDU)

501. Teaching Reading and Writing. (3 hours) A course designed to help elementary and secondary teachers to informally assess literacy skills; plan and design appropriate literacy programs; and implement strategies to facilitate the acquisition of reading and writing skills.

502. Problems Teaching Reading-Middle Grades. (1-3 hours) A graduate course designed to acquaint the student with various approaches to teaching reading at the middle school level. Current research in reading is presented and students translate that information into effective instructional strategies.

506. History and Philosophy of Education. (3 hours) Like EDU 504, this course relates philosophies of education and their application to current educational practices and problems. In addition, EDU 506 relates historical milestones in education, both worldwide and American, to education practice and institutions of the present. This course is required for initial certification programs at the graduate level, but is an acceptable substitute for EDU 504 in the regular M.A. degree program prior to 2006.

507. Testing, Measurement, Statistics. (2 hours) A study of standardized and teacher-made tests. Application of statistical methods will be addressed in relationship to the development and interpretation of these tests.

509. Teaching Math in the Elementary Grades. (3 hours) A course designed to help the elementary school teacher improve the techniques to facilitate the learning of elementary school mathematics.

510. Foundations: Becoming a Teacher Leader. (3 hours) This initial course in the Teacher Leader Master’s program examines the role of the teacher leader in today’s schools and engages students in self-assessment of relevant skills, providing a foundation upon which their professional development as teacher leaders will be built. Candidates examine the governance and process of schooling, as well as personal identity as professionals within a democratic and pluralistic society, including consideration of legal and ethical considerations for teacher leaders. The course supports the College’s mission and tradition by giving each individual the opportunity to examine, evaluate, and develop a personal view of service to students, the teaching profession, and professional development within the context of developing teacher leader skills. Study of relevant professional literature, reviews of school and individual improvement plans (e.g., CSIP, PGP), self-evaluation, introspection, reflection, and collegial dialogue are incorporated throughout the class. As students move toward a deeper understanding of themselves as education professionals and their capacity to be teacher leaders, they will draft a research problem that identifies an issue they would like to examine in their Capstone Research Project. Although there is flexibility to revise and refine their research problems, establishing a starting point in the initial course will provide students with a context for their remaining courses. The research problem and the student’s reflection on the development of that problem will be initial entries in the student’s Teacher Leader Portfolio. In addition, students will develop a Professional Growth Plan (PGP) that identifies particular areas for professional growth of teacher leader skills and is consistent with needs within school contexts. As with the Capstone, the PGP will serve as a guiding document to be revisited and revised throughout the program.

516. Research-Based Practices in Literacy Instruction K-12. (3 hours) This is a basic course in advanced literacy methods taken prior to the clinical practicum experience. This course examines research in literacy instruction K-12 and will provide needed foundational knowledge.

517. Educational Policy and Theoretical Foundations of Literacy. (3 hours) In this course, graduate students will examine of the relationship between political policy and trends in educational policy and practice. The course will include readings and assignments designed to assist in the development of a concrete understanding of how educational policy affects the classroom. Graduate students will then investigate the implications of current educational policy on a school.

520. Foundations of Gifted Education. (3 hours) Candidates study the historical background of the concept of gifted education; theories of intelligence and other abilities; growth and development of the gifted student, and special problems encountered by gifted children.

521. Curriculum and Instruction in Gifted Education. (3 hours) Candidates study current research in curriculum for the gifted; explore various curriculum models and relevant teaching principles, and produce a workable curriculum design. They also explore regional and local regulations pertaining to services to gifted and talented students, curriculum designs of various districts, and actual teacher practices.

522. Differentiating for Gifted Learners in the Regular Classroom. (3 hours) Candidates in EDU 522 learn and apply to the classroom effective methods for differentiating curriculum and instruction in the regular classroom for gifted students and others.

523. Practicum in Gifted Education.(2 or 3 hours) Candidates complete a series of tasks which are applications of much of the material from EDU 520 and 521, includ­ing working directly with gifted students. In addition to completing the tasks, candidates are expected to communicate online with the others taking the course to establish and maintain collegial relatiionships.

525. Teaching Science in the Elementary Grades. (3 hours) An exploration of various aspects of teaching science to elementary students: the philosophical bases of science, integration with other subjects, methodologies, classroom organization and management, analysis of science curriculum, and application of the principles covered.

527. Advanced Applications of Technology for Teacher Leaders. (3 hours) This blended course explores theories, models, research, practical applications, current issues, and current approaches to educational technology leadership. By focusing on the integration of technology into curriculum, pedagogy, school management, and instructional leadership, the course exposes teacher leaders to a wide variety of 21st century technology issues. Delivered in a blended mode by the professor in partnership with other recognized local, state, and/or national technology leaders, the course covers current topics and research in educational technology as well as practical applications of technology and technology skills essential for teacher leaders in the digital age. This course provides candidates with skills to use technology tools to enhance student learning  through data collection and analysis, including collecting, organizing, and reporting data for response to intervention; differentiation; instructional delivery systems; and communication with a variety of audiences. The course examines pedagogical issues related to instructional technology, such as identifying appropriate technologies for various instructional needs, universal design, and globalization. Students will continue developing their Capstone Research Project by identifying and learning to use technology tools and processes to collect and analyze data and information needed to investigate a research problem in their school. The Teacher Leader Portfolio will include a revision of the research problem, a discussion of skills and information learned in EDU527 that will be used in the Capstone Research Project, and a reflection on how those skills and information will enhance the research. In addition, students will revisit the PGP to evaluate their progress toward meeting their professional growth needs.

529. Teaching in a Diverse Society: Deepening the Skills for Teacher Leaders.
(3 hours) Caring and committed educators who are teacher leaders serve children and families through knowledge of best practices and instructional differentiation. This course is designed to enhance candidates’ commitment to diversity and to students and families by developing quality instructional opportunities for all students regardless of language, race, ethnicity, gender, exceptionality, socioeconomic status, religion, ability status, sexual orientation or geographic area. Culturally responsive teachers facilitate and support learning for all students regardless of their diversities. This course depends candidate’s understanding of teaching and learning through examination of the diverse make-up of today’s communities, schools and classrooms. Through personal reflection and identification of theoretically sound and culturally responsive pedagogy, this course prepares the candidate to model, mentor and lead efforts in creating a school climate that effectively addresses the learning needs of all students. In this course, candidates will be assessed on their ability to design and implement an instructional plan that is research-based and differentially relevant for diverse populations.

532. Effective Classroom Instruction for Middle and Secondary Students. (3
hours) A course designed for students in the alternative initial certification program that provides a foundation for designing and planning effective classroom instruction for middle and secondary students—using National and Kentucky curriculum documents, research, and best practices. Course activities are online and are differentiated and various majors/subject areas.

535. Mentored Teaching for MA Certification I. (7 hours) Mentored teaching experience for students in MA with Alternative Certification program for middle and/or secondary teachers. Requires advisor approval.

536. Mentored Teaching for MA Certification II. (6 hours) Second half of the mentored teaching experience for students in MA with Alternative Certification program for middle and/or secondary teachers. This may be taken in the same semester as EDU 535. Requires advisor approval.

540. Independent Study in Education. (1-3 hours) Study of selected issues and topics in education.

542. Classroom Applications of Technology. (2 hours) Introduction to computers as an educational tool through study of application software packages for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, and the use of the Internet and e-mail in the classroom. Assistive technology and universal design for learning is included for special education teachers.

544. Classroom Management and Discipline. (3 hours) Discusses developmental aspects of student behavior, motivation, and related factors in developing positive classroom behavior for students of various cultural backgrounds and exceptional education needs. (School-based clinical component required).

545. Curriculum and Assessment for Teacher Leaders . (3 hours) Assessment is used to evaluate various qualities of students and to predict and measure the attainment of learning outcomes in the curriculum. The results of assessment are used to direct caring teachers in planning the best ways to guide, motivate, and nurture student learning, and is thus a critical part of the teaching and reflective processes. Instruction is based on a link between the learning outcomes and assessments at various points in time: pre-assessment; formative assessment; and summative assessment. It is vital that candidates acquire expertise in aligning these features for maximum pupil learning. A major leadership area for teachers is decision-making—deciding on the basis of curriculum design; evaluating the ready-made products available; and designing and choosing instruction and assessment methods that match the learning outcomes. All of these decisions are made in a variety of contexts—in individual classrooms, with grade level or subject teams, and as leaders on designated committees. The decisions are expressed through classroom action, team-derived products, professional development programs, committee actions, and other arenas. Candidates will study the ways that curriculum outcomes, assessment, and instruction align. They will investigate the use of assessment to determine pupil needs and to evaluate the effects of instruction according to the desired outcomes. Beginning with general theories of curriculum and assessment, candidates will explore a variety of forms of assessment tasks, including those which may indicate learning problems, special abilities, and pupil achievement; identify criteria for determining appropriate and effective assessment; examine assessment from a student-centered perspective; gain competence in applying and interpreting assessments; and explore legal and ethical aspects of assessment. They will also simulate leadership formats with fellow candidates as they study, analyze, reflect on, and communicate curriculum/ assessment features and problems. For the core assessment of this course, candidates will outline an overall assessment plan, carry out a clinical experience and analyze the results, and complete a final reflection. Classroom tasks in connection with the core assessment will include collaborative analysis of assessment results in groups of candidates with similar teaching certification, group critiques of assessment items, and presentations of special selected topics in curriculum/ assessment. Other classroom activities in EDU 545 will include tests on assessment knowledge and discussion activities with fellow class members.

546. Review of Educational Research. (2-3 hours) Designed to expose teachers to research specifically related to teacher effectiveness and factors affecting instruction. Attention will be given to the research methodology utilized and the possible application of the findings to the classroom situation. (This course builds upon the competencies acquired in this area at the Master’s Degree level.)

548. Exceptionalities and Schooling. (3 hours) Education provides an overview of the major categories of exceptionalities—including the history, practices, advances, problems, and challenges. The course is designed for students who have not had an introductory course in special education at the graduate level and for students in the middle/secondary alternative certification program who must implement appropriate services for students with special needs in regular classrooms.

550. Seminar in Education. (2-3 hours) Subjects for study will vary with the needs and interests of students (substitutions may be approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Education).

552. Field Studies for MAAC. (3 hours) Candidates will work in a clinical setting (classroom laboratory) exploring the art and science of teaching including the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional plans. (School-based clinical component required).

556. Current Topics in Instructional Technology. (2-3 hours) This course will explore current topics related to instructional technology in P-12 schools. Because instructional technology is constantly changing, the specific course content will change each time it is taught. However, the general areas covered will be grounded by the National International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE) Student, Teacher, Administrator, and Technology Facilitator (TF) standards. Along with the course, students will complete the capstone project for the Teacher Leader Master of Arts as a part of this course. If a student takes this course and does not want to complete the capstone project, the student will be given a technology-related practicum project to complete.

557. Planning and Management of Technology in Schools. (3 hours) Course addresses issues related to administering a technology environment at a classroom and school level. Addresses ISTE TF Standards TF-VIII, TF-V.D.4, TF-1.A.1-2, and TF-VI Prerequisite: Admission to IT program or permission of instructor.

558. Developing and Using Web-based Resources in the P-12 Classroom. (3 hours) This course addresses issues in teaching children and adults how to use instructional technology to enhance learning and increase productivity. Topics include, but are not limited to, learning theories related to technology skills acquisition, classifications of technology used in schools, identifying, evaluating, and designing technology professional development resources for teachers, and technology standards for students and teachers. Through the practicum, this course will provide experiences working with teachers who are implementing technology in instructional units and with students. Prerequisite: Admission to IT Endorsement program and successful completion of at least 2 technology
courses

560. Methods of Teaching Technology Concepts with Practicum. (2-3 hours) This course addresses issues in teaching children and adults how to use instructional technology to enhance learning and increase productivity. Topics will include, but are not limited to, learning theories related to technology skills acquisition, classifications of technology used in schools, identifying, evaluating, and designing technology professional development resources for teachers, and technology standards for students and teachers. Through the practicum, this course will provide experiences working with teachers who are implementing technology in instructional units and with students. Prerequisite: Admission to IT endorsement program and successful completion of at least 2 technology courses.

562. Research and Practice: Assessing and Facilitating Students’ Literacy Development I. (3 hours) The first of two practicum courses that require teachers to assess continuously the literacy development of individual students over two semesters and implement specific intervention strategies that address student’s needs. Prerequisite: EDU 501, 502, or 516.

563. Research and Practice: Assessing and Facilitating Students’ Literacy
Development II. (3 hours) The second of two practicum courses that require teachers to assess continuously the literacy development of individual students over two semesters and implement specific intervention strategies that address student’s needs. Prerequisite: EDU 562.

565. Human Development, Behavior and Learning. (2 hours) Study of normal growth and development, research in physical, social and emotional development, causes of behavior and learning theories.

570. Topics in Education. (2-3 hours)

572. Inclusive and Responsive Teaching. (3 hours) This course balances developing knowledge of multiple strategies for individualizing instruction in the inclusive classroom with developing professional collaboration skills, including consultation, teaming, co-teaching, mentoring, and engaging parent support. The course is based on job-embedded assignments that involve practical field experiences and professional activities in the classroom and school environment. Reflection is an essential component of this course.

580. ESL Teaching Methods and Techniques. (3 hours) Knowledge derived from the linguistic sciences about the nature of language and how it is learned will serve as the basis for the exploration and evaluation of various methods, techniques, and approaches to the teaching of English as a second language.

581. ESL Assessment and Culture. (3 hours) This course is a practical application of ESL methods and a continuation of ESL methods. This course will deepen the theoretical concepts of the methods course and will focus on the assessment process of ESL student achievement.

583. ESL Linguistic Theory and Analysis. (3 hours) This course familiarizes students with key concepts of Linguistic research and human language. In addition, English grammar is reviewed and practiced.

584. Effective Learning Environments: Developing Educators with a Spirit
of Service. (3 hours) This initial course in the Master of Arts in Education Program engages participants in an examination of important issues in designing effective learning environments and their impact on student learning. Students also reflect on who they are as teachers, colleagues, and models of the teaching profession to their communities. Participants will explore interactions with the environment as a core concept of learning and as an essential aspect of encouraging a spirit of service.

585. ESL Leadership. (3 hours) This course will provide training to teachers to transition from being ESL teachers to becoming ESL managers and leaders in their schools or districts. This course will train the participants to guide their school communities to a successful integration of students and families with heritage languages and cultures other than American and to help classroom teachers to overcome achievements gaps in their classrooms. Participants in this course will discuss issues within a framework of sociocultural and leadership concepts.

586. Competent Teaching through Technology and Inquiry. (3 hours) This web-enhanced course is designed to introduce students to common and cuttingedge technology for use in the school and classroom. The major focus of this course is to provide students with hands-on, practical experiences with technology that can be infused into their teaching and administrative duties and can be put to immediate use. Upon completion of this course, students will have an increased ability to effectively and efficiently implement and use technology in the school and classroom.

587. Communicating with Immigrants. (3 hours) This course will assist teachers to understand how the home language and culture may impact school achievement in ESL populations by the example of some language minority groups. The course will further deepen the knowledge of how culture and language interface and how they create reality for learners.

589. ESL Special Topics/Academies. (3 hours) This course will provide training in issues of law, State and Federal mandates, No Child Left Behind, and National Board certification for ESL teachers. The focus of this course may vary depending on new initiatives or pressing issues facing teachers. If applicable, the particular focus of this course will be publicized in the course announcement in the respective course catalogue.

591. Closing the Achievement Gap: Implementing Culturally Responsive Literacy and Content Instruction. (3 hours) Caring and committed educators serve children through knowledge of culturally relevant best practices and instructional differentiation. This course is designed to enhance candidates’ commitment to diversity and to students and families by developing quality instructional opportunities for all students. In this course, candidates will be assessed on their ability to design and implement instruction that is research-based and culturally relevant. This course is to be taken in module 2, after candidates have had the opportunity to reflect on the conceptual framework and on their own teaching practices. Prerequisite: EDU 584 (for MA or MARW).

593. Using Classroom Assessment Data to Inform Instruction. (3 hours) Students will study the use of assessment to determine pupil needs and to evaluate the effects of instruction. Beginning with a general theory of assessment, students will explore a variety of forms of assessment tasks, including those which may indicate learning problems, special abilities, and pupil achievement; identify criteria for determining appropriate and effective assessment; examine assessment from a student-centered perspective; gain competence in applying and interpreting assessments; and explore legal and ethical aspects of assessment. The clinical experience will have students use their own, teacher-designed assessments to inform their own instruction and subsequent assessment procedures. Thus the students will be able to see the effects of their application on the P-12 student population. Prerequisite: EDU 584.

594. Developing Teacher Leadership through Research. (3 hours) This course introduces action research as a powerful agent of educational change. The class will enhance candidates’ existing abilities to use action research principles in their roles as teacher leaders not only as critical consumers of research but as researchers themselves. Students will explore quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and understand the roles of various methodologies and data in action research that addresses issues of student achievement. Candidates will develop skills to be critical consumers of information and research in the field of education, exploring issues such as research design, population sampling, data collection instruments and methods, and data analysis in contemporary research. Working toward the implementation of their Capstone Research Project, students will refine their review of literature, design the study, develop research questions, and operationalize key terms and processes in an action research project to test their hypotheses. Students will explore research ethics and related regulations. Students will complete the Institutional Review Board application and submit their Capstone Research Project Research Proposal to the IRB for review. This course is designed to provide opportunities for candidates to demonstrate scholarship and leadership in educational settings by designing a research project around a concrete educational matter, and is consistent with the mission statement of the unit to develop scholars who are competent and caring educators, committed to a spirit of service and learning.

595. Implementation of Capstone Research Project. (1 hour) This class represents the capstone course for the MA in Leadership program and is to be taken immediately after EDU 594 course and/or in conjunction with their chosen endorsement or content focus area practicum. Students will implement the Capstone Research Project in their professional practice. They will collect, analyze, and report data; draw conclusions; prepare a written analysis of the conclusions in light of existing research; and make suggestions for future research. This course is designed to provide opportunities for candidates to demonstrate scholarship and teacher leader skills by reporting their findings in an educational setting such as a presentation at the school level and an educational conference proposal. Candidates who are completing an endorsement or special program will implement their Capstone Research Project in the final practicum course in their program. Since the Capstone will focus on student achievement, the endorsement and special program Capstones will integrate issues of student achievement with content and skills from the specialty area. As in EDU595, these students will collect and analyze data, draw conclusions, prepare a written analysis of the conclusions in light of existing research, and make suggestions for future research. The audience for presentation of these projects will include persons interested in the student achievement issue, the specialty area, or both.This course is designed to provide opportunities for candidates to demonstrate scholarship and leadership in educational settings by presentation at the school level and conference proposal, and is consistent with the mission statement of the unit to develop scholars who are competent and caring educators, committed to a spirit of service and learning.

596. Research Methods: Commitment to Educated Decision-Making through Research. (3 hours) This course presents a survey of commonly used quantitative and qualitative research methods in education with emphasis on the rigor of a sound action research design. Students will identify a problem that warrants scientific attention and they will create a research proposal with IRB approval.

597. Developing Servant Leaders for Schools through Inquiry. (3 hours) This class represents the capstone course for the Master of Arts in Education program and is to be taken immediately after EDU 596: Research Methods. In EDU 596, candidates select a research topic based upon assessed needs within their classroom or school, and complete a comprehensive review of the literature on their topic. EDU 597 is a continuation of the research process. In this course, candidates apply their knowledge of content and pedagogy through implementing an action research project in a classroom or school.

598. Practicum: Literacy Leadership in Schools. (3 hours) This is the final practicum experience in the Reading/Writing Program and is designed to prepare candidates for work as a literacy coach or specialist. Candidates use assessment data to plan literacy programs in their schools, collaborating with teachers and administrators to implement an instructional plan that is consistent with the school’s needs. Candidates also confer with classroom teachers about their literacy instructional practices and assist them in improving those practices.

600. Leaders as Scholars: Philosophical Foundations and Issues in Education. (3 hours) In this course, candidates examine current educational issues, policies and school realities within a historical and philosophical framework. Candidates reflect upon their own philosophical and ideological views, determine the theoretical perspectives that are reflected in a school’s mission and vision statements, and examine the coherence of school practices within this theoretical context. Candidates also explore the evolution of teacher leadership as it relates to school improvement.

602. Identifying and Addressing Literacy Needs of Diverse Learners. (3 hours) This course deepens candidates’ understanding of how learners’ diverse backgrounds and experiences may affect their literacy learning and goals. Theories and practices related to assessment, instructional materials, instructional strategies, and classroom dynamics are considered. This course examines aspects of diversity including cultural diversity, linguistic diversity, socioeconomics, and the rural/urban continuum. Candidates refine their literacy assessment and instruction skills while working with diverse learners in a reading clinic setting.

604. Collaboration: Meeting the Needs of All Learners. (3 hours) This course addresses inclusion, collaboration, and advocacy approaches to working with children and youth with diverse needs. Approaches for differentiating instruction in an inclusive classroom are presented. Procedures for working with parents and educators in collaborative settings are addressed. Related and transitional services are discussed. Different models to collaboration are offered as well as research and best practices related to response to intervention [RtI].

606. Educational Technology for the 21st Century Learner. (3 hours) This course will focus on using technology to meet the diverse learning needs of the 21st century student. Current topics, trends, and research on using technology in schools will be discussed, with special emphasis on using technology to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.

608. Using Data for Instructional Decision-Making. (3 hours) Candidates examine demographic and achievement data in their school against a backdrop of current educational issues. They conduct classroom research, interviews, surveys, walkthroughs, literature reviews, and job-embedded professional development in addition to consulting professional web sites, organizations, and relevant funding sources (to be included in a school portfolio). Candidates then analyze these data given their school’s goals and mission statement, and develop a school improvement plan. Candidates also study current frameworks, theories, practices, and techniques used for school/teacher leadership.

609. Practicum for School Leaders. (3 hours) Candidates implement their school leadership plan in this course and gather data on school improvement results. Candidates present results to school staff and the school’s site-based council following implementation.

Exceptional Child Education (ECE) (Including LBD, MSD, AUTISM)

500. Educational Evaluation. (3 hours). A course covering principles of tests and measurement, interpretation of assessment techniques as applied to Special Education and application of assessment data to individualized education programs and classroom assessment strategies.

501. Behavior Management for LBD Students. (3 hours) This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of behavioral assessment and intervention strategies based on behavior management techniques, including how to design learning environments that help prevent problem behaviors.

502. Introduction to LBD. (3 hours) A historical overview of the field of special education will be presented. This course will provide information and knowledge on legislation and litigation in special education. Characteristics of children and youth with disabilities and procedures for eligibility and provision of special education and related services. Special education laws will be addressed relevant to the course content.

503. Educational Programming for LBD Students. (3 hours) A course designed to prepare teacher candidates to instruct P-12 students with mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, behavior disorders, or mild orthopedic handicaps. Content includes effective teaching and learning strategies, development of lesson and unit plans to meet curriculum requirements based on student needs, and differentiation with specially designed instruction in academic areas.

504. Collaboration and Advocacy. (2 hours) This course addresses inclusion, collaboration, and advocacy approaches to working with children and youth with disabilities. Approaches for differentiated instruction in an inclusive classroom are presented. Procedures for working with parents and educators in collaborative settings and related and transitional services are discussed.

508. Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). (3 hours) This course will provide information about the various manifestations of Autism Spectrum Disorders, including current trends in diagnosis and treatment. It will also address the unique challenges related to learning needs across the spectrum including language, social behaviors, theory of mind, and sensory processing. It will address the historical foundations of autism through present day findings and general supports. Additionally, information will be provided about instruction and supports provided through special education laws and regulations. The outcome for participants will allow them to understand practices with identified needs. Participants will also increase their understanding of the challenges parents face in raising a child on the spectrum, as well as how they may be a valuable participant in the student’s team.

510. Evidence-Based and Other Instructional Practices for ASD. (3 hours) Evidence-based instructional practices are mandated by both NCLB and IDEIA. However, most educators have difficulty identifying and implementing such practices in the classroom. This course will examine the research related to evidence-based practices and provide participants with the core strategies recognized by research today. Such strategies will include: social narratives, using work systems, visual supports, incorporating technology, and communication systems. Participants will learn how to analyze student needs through case studies; design and implement an effective educational program matched to student needs to promote communication, on-going learning, and adaptive behavioral skills; structure the physical environment to support learning; provide links between special interests and curriculum; and adapt core content related to Kentucky’s Program of Studies. The content of the course will be supplemented by ECE 511, a lab class held for two hours one Saturday a month. Participation in the lab is a requirement of this course.

511. Evidence-Based and Other Instructional Practices for ASD-Lab. (1 hour) This course will serve as a lab for students enrolled in the Evidence-Based Practices for Autism class. The purpose of the lab will be to provide hands-on learning opportunities for students to further develop skills in creating visual supports and other strategies within the course. The lab will provide additional practice as well as serve as a venue for learning how to use technology to support students with ASD. Students with ASD benefit from instructional strategies that are largely dependent on the development and use of visual supports. Participants will attend a lab once a month to further support their ability to develop such instructional supports through various materials and software. They will also be able to develop materials used in adapting core content from the Kentucky Program of Studies.

512. Analyzing Behavior for Students with ASD. (3 hours) This course will provide participants with the tools needed to build on their knowledge of autism while learning to assess behavioral needs. Various strategies will be reviewed to analyze student behavior, identify variables related to the behaviors that are unique to ASD, and develop programs that promote positive behavioral supports (PBS). Some of the strategies addressed will include the Ziggurat model, developed by Aspy and Grossman. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to conduct an assessment of ASD student behavior and develop a behavior plan with identified strategies for instruction and support.

514. Autism Spectrum Disorder Advanced Practicum. (2 hours) The intent of any practicum is for the new teacher to effectively demonstrate their learned skills in a classroom setting. Participants will demonstrate their competence, according to the CEC standards and the Georgetown College Conceptual Framework by submitting a portfolio of work. The content will require the participant to complete a portfolio that includes the following: identify the manifestations and needs of student(s) with ASD, review assessment data, observe the student, interview relevant staff/parents, create an instructional plan, and videotape one model lesson. It is expected that students will complete 30 clock hours in completing the required portfolio.

575 A. Field Studies in LBD Component I Part A. (3 hours) This course is the first of two field courses taken in the first 20 hours of the program (taught in fall and spring only). All candidates who are teaching on an LBD Temporary Provisional certificate must take ECE 575A in their first semester. Using Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP) as a model and with the assistance of a mentor teacher and a college supervisor, students will develop and teach lesson plans, assess personal professional strengths and needs and develop strategies to pinpoint specific areas in which classroom effectiveness can be improved. Mentored teaching provides information and experiences that address the need for consistent sensitivity to individual, academic, physical, social and cultural differences through demonstration of competencies required by the Kentucky Teacher Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Standards, and the Georgetown Conceptual Framework. Students will be in their LBD classroom or an LBD approved placement for at least 60 hours. Prerequisites: ECE 501 or ECE 502 (may be concurrent with ECE 575A for students on an LBD Temporary Provisional certificate). This course is offered fall and spring semesters only.

575 B. Field Studies in LBD Component I Part B. (3 hours) This course is the second of two field course taken in the first 20 hours of the program (taught in fall and spring only). All candidates who are teaching on an LBD Temporary Provisional certificate must continue in ECE 575B for continuous mentored teaching while in the classroom. This course continues the objectives of ECE 575A, with particular emphasis on classroom assessment ,assistive technology, and development of a professional growth plan. Students will be in their LBD classroom for an LBD approved placement for at least 60 hours. This course is offered fall and spring semesters only. Prerequisites: ECE 575A, 501, and 502.

576. Field Studies in LBD Component II, Final Clinical Practice. (6 hours) To take 576, students are required to be teaching in an LBD position or be in an approved Georgetown placement for 240 clock hours, and to have taken and passed both LBD PRAXIS tests. Utilizing school classrooms as the laboratory, this course continues the objectives of ECE 575 A-B, and students should be proficient in the teaching standards by the end of the course. Students should complete ECE 576 as soon as they meet Checkpoint 2 requirements in the LBD continuous assessment system. This course is offered fall and spring semesters only. Prerequisites: ECE 500-504, 575 A and B.

600. Introduction to Teaching Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities. (3 hours) This course addresses the issues and trends of teaching persons who are diagnosed with moderate and severe disabilities. Focus is on the instructional, social, education, and transitional needs. Working with families and collaboration in inclusive settings is included.

602. Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities. (3 hours) This course analyzes assessment techniques and explores prescriptive programming for moderate to severely disabled persons from infancy to adulthood. Diagnostic and prescriptive programming experiences are necessary in field-based practicum. Candidates are required to complete a field practicum working with MSD students as a requirement of this class. Prerequisites for course include ECE 600.

604. Teaching Individuals with Physical or Multiple Disabilities. (3 hours) This course surveys causes and educational implications of physical disabilities and sensory impairments. It addresses a broad range of issues of importance to the health and physical problems of students with multiple disabilities.

606. Transition Services for Students with Disabilities. (3 hours) This course will address the needs of personnel working with special education students preparing to make the transition from school to adulthood. The course will provide information on: the basic adult needs of person with developmental disabilities and an interdisciplinary services model to meet those needs. Emphasis will be placed upon the systematic planning and coordination of services that are required for persons with disabilities to achieve maximum quality of life.

608. Field Component in MSD. (3 or 6 hours) ECE 608 is a mentored field experience. As part of the Rank I MSD degree, candidates will enroll for three or six hours of mentored teaching as final clinical practice-utilizing school classrooms as the laboratory. Using KTIP as a model and with the assistance of a mentor teacher and a college supervisor, candidates will assess strengths and needs of MSD students in a chosen classroom. When the needs have been identified for each student, various strategies will be utilized to pinpoint specific areas in which classroom effectiveness can be improved. Candidates should show consistent sensitivity to individual, academic, physical, social and cultural differences and respond in a caring manner. Mentored Teaching provides information and experiences that address this sensitivity through demonstration of the competencies required by the Kentucky Teacher Standards as well as essential information regarding teaching as a profession and the Council for Exceptional Children Standards for MSD. A leadership plan and professional growth plan addressing the Kentucky Teacher Standards will be completed in ECE 608.

English (ENG)

516. Applied Linguistics. (3 hours) This course familiarizes students with key concepts of linguistic research and human language. In addition, English grammar is reviewed and practiced.

526. Teaching Composition Across the Curriculum. (3 hours) A study of important principles and methods used in teaching writing as a learning tool. Using guidelines from the state and National Writing Project, as well as benchmark essays, the class will study (1) how to improve their writing assignments in various disciplines at different levels; (2) how to improve peer review and group work to minimize teacher work and to allow student ownership of writing/learning; (3) how to improve evaluation and grading of student writing in order to improve school district assessment scores.

535. Topics in Shakespeare. (3 hours) Appreciation of Shakespeare’s art in light of Renaissance culture and theatrical conditions. Required is the close reading of about six plays or the skills equivalent in non-dramatic works, with emphasis upon critical history and the bibliographic requisite for keeping up-to-date with developments in Shakespeare studies.

540. Independent Study in English. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in English. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in English. (2-3 hours)

French (FRE)

500. The Post-Colonial Experience: African and Caribbean Literatures. (3 hours) A study of colonial expansion and its aftermath from a French perspective. The course uses novels to explore this history in order to better understand the current cultural, political, and economic specificities of former French colonies such as Haiti, Martinique, Senegal and Algeria.

540. Independent Study in French. (1-3 hours)

History (HIS)

500. History of the Antebellum South. (2-3 hours) Provides an understanding of the economic, social, and the cultural life of the South before the Civil War, and shows how the South’s distinctive regional qualities have entered the mainstream of American life.

512. Music and Culture in the Baroque Era. (3 hours)

514. Kentucky History Across the Curriculum. (3 hours) Kentucky’s State Historian presents content from Kentucky’s history with strategies for classroom implementation as shared by an experienced classroom teacher.

526. History of Pioneer Kentucky. (2-3 hours) The story of state-making in Kentucky, the first frontier state, which is an important contribution to the political, social, and cultural life of the United States.

540. Independent Study in History. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in History. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in U.S. History. (1-3 hours) Topics studied will vary with the interests of the students and instructors.

571. Topics in European History. (3 hours) Topics studied will vary with the interests of the students and instructors.

Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS)

500. Analysis of Sports Skills. (3 hours) Starting from a fundamental overview of human anatomy and physiology, physics and biomechanics, this course equips students to observe and accurately analyze skill performances to determine if they are correctly and efficiently executed. Recognizing physical differences and a variety of paths to success is the result.

502. Interpretation of Data in KHS. (2-3 hours) Comprehensive study of basic statistics and their application to measurement and evaluation in Kinesiology and Health Studies. Various physical fitness, general motor ability, health, skill, and knowledge tests are analyzed.

504. Games for Elementary and Middle School. (3 hours) This course is designed to provide the classroom teacher with a repertoire of educational activities and first hand experiences designed to make learning fun through the use of a variety of games and other physical activities. Activities will incorporate skills of running, jumping, throwing, kicking, catching, dancing, striking, thinking, and listening.

506. Issues and Trends in Physical Education. (3 hours) This course is designed to review the history, various philosophical views and influences on Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Dance and Athletics in the United States. This will include exploration of contemporary issues in these disciplines as they relate to education. Students will research the issues and defend their views concerning whether these trends are beneficial or counterproductive to the goals of education in Kentucky.

510. Influence of Sport on African-American Society. (3 hours) This course is designed to investigate the historical and sociological significance of sport in America, and in specific, its influence in the African-American society.

521. Anatomy and Kinesiology. (2-3 hours) Advanced study of the structure and movements of the human body.

540. Independent Study in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in Kinesiology. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in Kinesiology and Health Studies. (2-3 hours) Allows each student the opportunity to examine various issues and/or problems in Kinesiology or Health Studies.

Mathematics (MAT)

510. Analysis of Precalculus for Teachers. (2-3 hours) A refresher course on intuitive concepts of limits involving infinity, asymptotes, and absolute values followed by a detailed theoretical development of limits, beginning with definitions and proving theorems that relate to the problems first looked at intuitively. (For math majors and minors only.)

540. Independent Study in Math. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in Math. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in Math. (2-3 hours)

Music (MUS)

505. Music in the 20th Century. (3 hours) A study of new trends in serious music of the twentieth century from both the music literature and the theoretical points of view. Some ear-training including harmonic, melodic and contrapuntal materials is included. Special emphasis is placed on twelve tone analytical techniques and some composition.

507. History of Rock Music. (3 hours) A study of the origins, characteristics and stylistic development of rock and roll music from the early 1950s through the 1990s.

510. Digital Audio Techniques. (3 hours) An introduction to digital audio file creation, manipulation and storage with respect to applications in web environments, multimedia presentations, and for other professional purposes. Topics will include converting analog media to digital formats, noise reduction, multi-track recording, crossfading, editing, and other related subjects.

512. Music and Culture in the Baroque Era. (3 hours)

514. MIDI Computer Music. (3 hours) Study of the essential components of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) technology: synthesizer and sequencer capabilities; sequence recording and editing. Prerequisites: ability to read music; basic instrumental keyboard competency.

516. Digital Video Techniques. (3 hours) An introduction to digital video file creation, editing and storage with respect to applications in web environments, multimedia presentations, and for other professional purposes. Topics will include incorporating video transitions and effects, importing photos or artwork, importing and editing sound, adding titles and credits, converting visual analog formats to digital, and other related subjects. The course will use Windows Movie Maker software.

526. Digital Media in the Arts and Humanities Classroom. (3 hours) Digital media can play an important role in the arts and humanities classroom. This course will introduce students to the technical knowledge and skills needed to produce high quality digital media (graphics, video, audio) products to use in the P-12 classroom. In addition, students will explore practical ways to integrate digital media into arts and humanities content. This course will count as pedagogical content knowledge in arts and humanities for elementary education and secondary music, art, math/science students and as an elective in the instructional Technology endorsement.

540. Independent Study in Music. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in Music. (2-3 hours) Study of current music education research. The subject for study will be decided by the needs and interests of students.

570. Topics in Music. (2-3 hours)

Physics (PHY)

510. Classroom Demonstration of Chemistry and Physics Principles. (3 hours) This course is designed for elementary, middle, and secondary teachers who want to learn new practical methods for doing science in the classroom. Topics will include the scientific method, states of matter, chemical and physical changes, combustion reactions, solubility, acids and bases, polymers, household chemicals, density, pressure, waves, light and lasers, and refraction. Students will observe demonstrations and discuss the chemical and physical principles behind them, perform demonstrations, and design new demonstrations.

540. Independent Study in Physics. (1-3 hours)

570. Topics in Physics. (2-3 hours)

Political Science (POS)

524. School Law. (2-3 hours) A study of the major principles of constitutional law, case law, and Kentucky Revised Statutes related to education and teachers. Emphasis is on due process, tort liability, teacher contracts, pupil personnel, and desegregation.

526. Special Education Law. (3 hours) This course is designed to provide teachers with a basic understanding of the law and regulations governing the education of special needs students in the public schools of Kentucky. Students will use federal and state statutes and regulations, local policies and procedures and court decisions to gain an understanding of their requirements in the classroom.

528. American National Institutions: President and Congress. (3 hours) An introduction to the basic principles of American national institutions, with a focus on the interactions between president and Congress in the modern era. The course covers such topics as: constitutional origins; evolution and development of institutions; foreign policy; civil rights policy; social welfare policy; and economics and budget policy.

540. Independent Study in Political Science. (1-3 hours)

550. Seminar in Political Science. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in Political Science. (2-3 hours)

Psychology (PSY)

500. Individual Appraisal. (2-3 hours) Techniques and instruments in identifying individual differences, individual development, and individual need.

502. Multiple Intelligences. (3 hours)

510. Theories and Techniques of Counseling. (2-3 hours) A study of the major contemporary theories and techniques of counseling.

512. Instruments and Procedures in Group Guidance. (2-3 hours) Study of group procedures, and conditions for group guidance and counseling, use of resources, study of group dynamics, organization for group guidance.

533. Developmental Psychopathology. (3 hours)

535. Psychology of Exceptional Children. (2-3 hours) A study of the sociological, psychological and educational implications of exceptionality for the child, the parent/family, and the school. This course deals with handicapping conditions as well as giftedness.

537. Handling Challenging Behaviors. (3 hours)

540. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-3 hours)

542. Psychology Adjustment. (2-3 hours) A study of personality and personal adjustment through a study of the healthy personality.

544. Psychology of Personal Growth. (2-3 hours) (Coping with Stress) Emphasis is placed upon self-understanding and improvement of the self- concept. Deals with coping with stress and related teacher concerns which diminish teacher effectiveness.

550. Seminar in Behavioral Problems. (2-3 hours) A course designed for practitioners undertaking graduate research about behavioral problems encountered in school work.

565. Human Development, Behavior and Learning. (2 hours) Study of normal growth and development, research in physical, social and emotional development, causes of behavior and learning theories.

570. Topics in Psychology. (2-3 hours)

Sociology (SOC)

510. Community Analysis. (2-3 hours) The social structure of the community, major social organizations and inter-relationships.

520. The American Social System. (2-3 hours) The social structure of the American society, its development and changing functional aspects.

530. Sociology of Religion. (2-3 hours) Advanced sociological analysis of religious belief systems utilizing the cross-cultural approach, the role of religion in social order and social change.

532. Sociology of Education. (2-3 hours) Analysis of educational institutions in terms of the interaction of individuals and groups, educational processes, school and community relations and the function of the educator as an agent of socialization.

540. Independent Study in Sociology. (1-3 hours)

542. Human Relations in Schools. (2-3 hours) Identifies the basic need for positive relationships, current theories and practices and how they can strengthen the climate for effective discipline and human relations skills.

544. Sociology of Play, Recreation, and Leisure Time. (2-3 hours) Deals with the phenomenon of leisure time through an examination of recreational needs in a changing society.

546. Multicultural Education. (2-3 hours) A study of the cultural differences among the sub-cultures of the schools with emphasis upon improving understanding and relationships within the educational community.

550. Seminar in Sociology. (2-3 hours)

570. Topics in Sociology. (2-3 hours)

Theatre and Performance Studies (THE)

515. Children’s Theatre and Creative Drama. (3 hours) The theory and application of creative dramatics and children’s theater in education.

540. Independent Study in Theatre. (1-3 hours)

570. Using Performance and Kentucky Literature to Teach Kentucky Core Content. (3 hours) Through the use of group performance techniques, students will learn how to analyze, adapt, and stage literature by Kentucky authors. Students will understand how using performance to study literature in the classroom addresses Core Content for Arts and Humanities as well as other areas.

570. Topics in Theatre. (2-3 hours)